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Types of Honeysuckle

Amur ​Honeysuckle​
Amur ​Honeysuckle​

Amur honeysuckle is highly invasive and should not be planted in Ohio. Amur Honeysuckle is a noxious woody shrub, introduced in southern Ohio in the late 1950s but is now rampant across the state and throughout much of the Eastern United States.

Common ​Honeysuckle​
Common ​Honeysuckle​

Two popular subspecies of honeysuckle are American honeysuckle and Japanese honeysuckle. The American native trumpet honeysuckle, or Lonicera sempervirens, is a well-behaved, noninvasive plant in many U.S. areas. In contrast, many states consider Japanese honeysuckle, or Lonicera japonica, to be an invasive species.

Coral ​Honeysuckle​
Coral ​Honeysuckle​

Coral honeysuckle is a beautiful, fragrant, flowering vine native to the United States. It provides a great cover for trellises and fences that is the perfect alternative to its invasive, foreign cousins.

Evergreen ​Honeysuckle​
Evergreen ​Honeysuckle​

Trumpet Honeysuckle. Trumpet honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) is an evergreen to deciduous vine with coral to red trumpet-shaped flowers. The flowers are lined with yellow to gold. Hummingbirds are attracted to its flowers from spring to fall, and other birds enjoy the red to black berries it produces in fall.

Fly ​Honeysuckle​
Fly ​Honeysuckle​

Fly Honeysuckle Lonicera xylosteum. Name also: Dwarf Honeysuckle, European Fly Honeysuckle; Family: Honeysuckle Family – Caprifoliaceae; Growing form and height: Shrub. 1–2 m (3–7 ft.). Flower: Fairly small, irregular (zygomorphic). Petals 5, united, corolla yellowish-white, 10–15 mm long, bilabiate, upper lip four-lobed, lower lip entire.

Japanese ​Honeysuckle​
Japanese ​Honeysuckle​

Japanese honeysuckle has become naturalized in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Mexico, New Zealand, and much of the US, including Hawaii, as well as a number of Pacific and Caribbean islands. It is classified as a noxious weed in Texas, Illinois, and Virginia, and is banned in New Hampshire.

Lonicera ​Alpigena​
Lonicera ​Alpigena​

Lonicera alpigena L., known as alpine honeysuckle, is a species of honeysuckle native to mountain forests of Central and Southern Europe. It is sometimes cultivated as an ornamental plant outside its native range.

Lonicera ​Canadensis​
Lonicera ​Canadensis​

Andrea Wulf in Founding Gardeners, writes that Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, botanizing near Lake George in the Adirondacks, in 1791, were “amazed to find ‘honeysuckle of the gardens’ (most certainly Lonicera canadensis) growing wild on the banks of one lake”.

Lonicera ​Caprifolium​
Lonicera ​Caprifolium​

Genus Lonicera can be deciduous and evergreen shrubs, or climbers with twining stems. The tubular or two-lipped flowers, often very fragrant, are followed by red or black berries Details L. caprifolium is a strong-growing, twining deciduous shrub making a large climber with oval, blue-green leaves, the upper perfoliate.

source: rhs.org.uk
Lonicera ​Conjugialis​
Lonicera ​Conjugialis​

Lonicera conjugialis is a species of honeysuckle known by the common name purpleflower honeysuckle.It is native to the western United States from Pacific Northwest to the Sierra Nevada, where it grows in many types of mountain habitat, especially moist areas.

Lonicera ​Etrusca​
Lonicera ​Etrusca​

Lonicera etrusca is a species of honeysuckle known by the common name Etruscan honeysuckle. It is native to Europe and it is known elsewhere, including the Pacific Northwest of North America, as an introduced species where it has escaped cultivation.

Lonicera ​Interrupta​
Lonicera ​Interrupta​

Lonicera interrupta is a species of honeysuckle known by the common name chaparral honeysuckle. It is native to chaparral and mixed forest habitats in the foothills and mountain ranges of California, and to some mountains in Arizona.

Lonicera ​Pileata​
Lonicera ​Pileata​

Lonicera pileata is a dense, spreading, evergreen to semi-evergreen shrub which is typically grown as a high ground cover rising to 2-3' tall but spreading to 5-8' wide or more on horizontal branches which root at the nodes where they touch the ground.

Lonicera ​Subspicata​
Lonicera ​Subspicata​

Lonicera subspicata, a dicot, is a shrub that is native to California and is endemic (limited) to California.

source: calflora.org
Lonicera ​Xylosteum​
Lonicera ​Xylosteum​

Fly Honeysuckle Lonicera xylosteum. Name also: Dwarf Honeysuckle, European Fly Honeysuckle; Family: Honeysuckle Family – Caprifoliaceae; Growing form and height: Shrub. 1–2 m (3–7 ft.). Flower: Fairly small, irregular (zygomorphic). Petals 5, united, corolla yellowish-white, 10–15 mm long, bilabiate, upper lip four-lobed, lower lip entire.

Morrow's ​Honeysuckle​
Morrow's ​Honeysuckle​

Morrow's honeysuckle thrives at the edges of forests, roads, or other natural or man-made barriers, but is not limited to them, and is found in both mature and disturbed forests. In some areas, Morrow's honeysuckle is the dominant plant species, especially in areas of disturbed ecological succession.

Orange ​Honeysuckle​
Orange ​Honeysuckle​

You will need a partially shaded location for this honeysuckle, and while it is drought tolerant once established here, west of the Cascades, it prefers moist soil. The bright orange-red blooms appear in May and June, and are followed by red berries, eaten by a variety of birds, including finches, robins, flickers and juncos.

source: wnps.org
Pink ​Honeysuckle​
Pink ​Honeysuckle​

Japanese honeysuckle produces pink or red blossoms from summer through early autumn. You can train both species to a trellis, or let it ramble as a ground cover. Mow vines used as ground cover with the blades set as high as they will go in late winter to get rid of the dead undergrowth and control the spread.

Tatarian ​Honeysuckle​
Tatarian ​Honeysuckle​

Lonicera tatarica is a species of honeysuckle known by the common name Tartarian honeysuckle. It is native to Siberia and other parts of eastern Asia, but it is probably better known in North America, where it is a widespread introduced species and noxious weed.

Twinberry ​Honeysuckle​
Twinberry ​Honeysuckle​

Twinberry Honeysuckle (Lonicera involucrata (Richards) Banks ex. Spreng) By Sarah Malaby. Twinberry honeysuckle is a long-lived deciduous shrub which grows up to 10 feet in height. Leaves are bright green, elliptical, and paired opposite each other on the stem. Flowering occurs in June-July.

source: fs.fed.us
Winter ​Honeysuckle​
Winter ​Honeysuckle​

Winter honeysuckle makes an attractive backdrop for more colorful flowers. Growing winter honeysuckle shrubs is an easy way to fill your garden with early season flowers and fragrance, but the honeysuckle plants are considered highly invasive in some areas.

image: hngideas.com

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