A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of House Bugs

Ant​
Ant​

Crowds of these insects on your counters are a bother, but not a harm -- that type of ant doesn't cause damage to houses or carry disease. Keep an eye out for carpenter ants, though. They won't eat the wood in your house, but they will burrow into it to make nests. To keep the crawly critters out, plug up holes in your walls and windows to help keep them at bay.

source: webmd.com
Bed bug​
Bed bug​

If you misidentify a bed bug infestation, it gives the bugs more time to spread to other areas of the house or hitchhike a ride to someone else's house to start a new infestation. Learn about identifying bed bugs. Bites on the skin are a poor indicator of a bed bug infestation.

source: epa.gov
Beetle​
Beetle​

Beetles are the most common type of insect. Beetles are everywhere. But beetles can be confused with other kinds of insects, especially some true bugs. So how do you recognize a beetle? First look for the wings and wing covers. Most insects have wings, and those that do have two pairs.

Cockroach​
Cockroach​

Cockroaches are generalized insects, with few special adaptations, and may be among the most primitive living neopteran insects. They have a relatively small head and a broad, flattened body, and most species are reddish-brown to dark brown.

Cricket​
Cricket​

House crickets get their common name from the fact that they often enter houses where they can survive indefinitely. This cricket species was introduced from Europe and is now found throughout the United States but primarily east of the Rocky Mountains.

source: pestworld.org
Earwig​
Earwig​

All about earwig bugs: what they are, what they eat, how they behave, where they live, and how Orkin pest control can help get rid of earwigs.

source: orkin.com
image: nwpest.com
German ​Cockroach​
German ​Cockroach​

The German cockroach (Blattella germanica) is a small species of cockroach, typically about 1.1 to 1.6 cm (0.43 to 0.63 in) long. In colour it varies from tan to almost black, and it has two dark, roughly parallel, streaks on the pronotum running anteroposteriorly from behind the head to the base of the wings.

Housefly​
Housefly​

Crowds of these insects on your counters are a bother, but not a harm -- that type of ant doesn't cause damage to houses or carry disease. Keep an eye out for carpenter ants, though. They won't eat the wood in your house, but they will burrow into it to make nests.

source: webmd.com
Mosquito​
Mosquito​

Crowds of these insects on your counters are a bother, but not a harm -- that type of ant doesn't cause damage to houses or carry disease. Keep an eye out for carpenter ants, though. They won't eat the wood in your house, but they will burrow into it to make nests.

source: webmd.com
image: quoteimg.com
Pharaoh ant​
Pharaoh ant​

Pharaoh ants enter homes to take advantage of crumbs, spills, moisture and protective habitat sites. Grease stains, dead insects, and sweet drinks attract these pests. In pantries, pharaoh ants infest and eat sugary foods and proteins like honey, peanut butter, and baked goods, but they can also be found infesting locations that have no food sources present.

source: orkin.com
image: bugs.com
Rodent​
Rodent​

Our pest guide can aid you in pest and insect identification, so you can determine what pests may be damaging your property. Use our pest identifier today.

source: pestworld.org
Silverfish​
Silverfish​

Silverfish feed on carbohydrates, particularly sugars and starches. Cellulose, shampoos, glue in books, linen, silk and dead insects may be food sources. They have been found in unopened food packages.

source: orkin.com
image: pixshark.com
Tapinoma ​Sessile​
Tapinoma ​Sessile​

Tapinoma sessile is a species of small ant that goes by the common names odorous house ant, sugar ant, stink ant, and coconut ant. Their colonies are polydomous (consist of multiple nests) and polygynous (contain multiple reproducing queens).

Termite​
Termite​

House foundations, furniture, shelves and even books are all possible feeding sites for termites. Read more about what termites eat. Termite Habitat. Where do they live? Commonly, termites live in wooden structures, decayed trees, fallen timber, and soil. Habitats vary among species as some termites require different amounts of moisture.

source: orkin.com
image: quora.com
Weevil​
Weevil​

Often called flour bugs, because that is where they are frequently found, there are actually a number of types of weevil, including rice weevils, seed weevils, granary/grain weevils, maize weevils, and bean/pea/seed weevils, but the "true" weevils - with the snout nose, are the granary, rice, and maize weevils.

source: thespruce.com