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Types of Human Teeth

Canines
Canines

Canines rip food, but their position on either side of the mouth help guide the mouth and other teeth into the best biting position. Molars Molars are our main masticators–that is, molars are the teeth we most commonly associate with chewing.

source: aci.edu
Cuspids / Canines
Cuspids / Canines

One feature of cuspids and canine teeth is the fact that they are our longest teeth, with a pointed end, and surprisingly, only one implanted root. Canines rip food, but their position on either side of the mouth help guide the mouth and other teeth into the best biting position.

source: aci.edu
Incisors
Incisors

Incisors (from Latin incidere, "to cut") are the front teeth present in most mammals. They are located in the premaxilla above and on the mandible below. Humans have a total of eight (two on each side, top and bottom).

Molars
Molars

In humans, the molar teeth have either four or five cusps. Adult humans have twelve molars, in four groups of three at the back of the mouth. The third, rearmost molar in each group is called a wisdom tooth.

Premolars / Bicuspids
Premolars / Bicuspids

These teeth are also known as bicuspids. The premolars are considered transitional teeth, as they work to guide food from the cuspids near the front of the mouth back to the molars near the rear of the mouth for chewing. The Basics of the Human Premolar Human beings typically have eight total premolars.

Wisdom Teeth / Third Molars
Wisdom Teeth / Third Molars

Common past dental practice was a tendency to routinely remove wisdom teeth. Recent empirical research has concluded that this practice is unwise. Third molars in general should be left alone unless a problem develops and then they should be treated as any other teeth.