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Types of Humans

African Apes​
African Apes​

Humans split from our closest African ape relatives in the genus Pan around six to seven million years ago. We have features that clearly link us with African apes, but we also have features that appear more primitive.

source: sci-news.com
image: sci-news.com
Ardipithecus​
Ardipithecus​

Ardipithecus ramidus had a small brain, measuring between 300 and 350 cm 3. This is slightly smaller than a modern bonobo or female common chimpanzee brain, but much smaller than the brain of australopithecines like Lucy (~400 to 550 cm 3) and roughly 20% the size of the modern Homo sapiens brain.

image: mclibre.org
Chimpanzee​
Chimpanzee​

Human and chimp DNA is so similar because the two species are so closely related. Humans, chimps and bonobos descended from a single ancestor species that lived six or seven million years ago. As humans and chimps gradually evolved from a common ancestor, their DNA, passed from generation to generation, changed too. In fact, many of these DNA changes led to differences between human and chimp appearance and behavior.

source: amnh.org
Dryopithecus​
Dryopithecus​

Dryopithecus, genus of extinct ape that is representative of early members of the lineage that includes humans and other apes. Although Dryopithecus has been known by a variety of names based upon fragmentary material found over a widespread area including Europe, Africa, and Asia, it appears probable that only a single genus is represented.

Gigantopithecus​
Gigantopithecus​

Humans may have helped destroy the ape. Further studies of the teeth revealed that the ape was an herbivore, and bamboo was probably its favorite meal. Some scientists believe that an appetite focused on bamboo combined with increasing competition from more nimble humans eventually led to the extinction of Gigantopithecus.

Gorilla​
Gorilla​

The genetic material of apes is identical to that of humans to a very large degree. Differences are especially small in the nuclear DNA. Certain genes that were analyzed differ by only 1.2% between humans and chimpanzees, by 1.6% between humans and gorillas and by 1.8% between gorillas and chimpanzees.

Hominini​
Hominini​

Gray's tribe Hominini by definition includes both Pan and Homo. This definition is still adhered to in the proposal by Mann and Weiss (1996), which divides Hominini into three subtribes, Panina (containing Pan), Hominina ("homininans", containing Homo "humans"), and Australopithecina (containing several extinct "australopithecine" genera).

Human​
Human​

Now I'm so confused about these words, human, humans, human being, and human beings. What's the difference betwee them? 'Humans' and 'human beings' are just the plural forms of 'human' and 'human being'?

image: qz.com
Humans​
Humans​

Now I'm so confused about these words, human, humans, human being, and human beings. What's the difference betwee them? 'Humans' and 'human beings' are just the plural forms of 'human' and 'human being'?

Kenyapithecus​
Kenyapithecus​

Other articles where Kenyapithecus is discussed: Louis Leakey: …team discovered the remains of Kenyapithecus, another link between apes and early man that lived about 14 million years ago.

image: imgkid.com
Neanderthal​
Neanderthal​

Neanderthal expert Erik Trinhaus has long promoted the interbreeding hypothesis, but the theory really caught fire when a 2010 study published in Science magazine determined that Neanderthal DNA is 99.7 percent identical to modern human DNA (a chimp's is 99.8 percent identical).

Orangutan​
Orangutan​

Orangutans, not chimpanzees, are the closest living relatives to humans, a controversial new study contends. The authors base their conclusion on a close physical resemblance between orangutans and humans, which they say has been overshadowed by genetic evidence linking us to chimps.

image: phys.org
Orrorin​
Orrorin​

Living around 6 million years ago, Orrorin tugenensis is the one of the oldest early humans on our family tree. Individuals of this species were approximately the size of a chimpanzee and had small teeth with thick enamel, similar to modern humans.

Ouranopithecus​
Ouranopithecus​

Ouranopithecus was a genus of Eurasian great ape represented by two species, Ouranopithecus macedoniensis, a late Miocene (9.6–8.7 mya) hominoid from Greece and Ouranopithecus turkae, also from the late Miocene (8.7–7.4 mya) of Turkey.

image: pixshark.com
Paranthropus ​Boisei​
Paranthropus ​Boisei​

P. boisei belongs to just one of the many side branches of human evolution, which most scientists agree includes all Paranthropus species and did not lead to H. sapiens. The 1975 discovery of P. boisei specimen KNM-ER 406 and H. erectus specimen KNM-ER 3733 in the same stratigraphic layer was the first example of species coexistence.

Paranthropus ​Robustus​
Paranthropus ​Robustus​

Paranthropus robustus was the first discovery of a "robust" species of hominin; it was found well before P. boisei and P. aethiopicus. These three species have alternately been in their own (Paranthropus) or placed within the genus Australopithecus.

Pierolapithecus​
Pierolapithecus​

Pierolapithecus catalaunicus Moyà-Solà et al., 2004 Pierolapithecus catalaunicus is an extinct species of primate which lived about 13 million years ago during the Miocene in what is now Hostalets de Pierola, Catalonia , giving the name to the species.

Rama's ape​
Rama's ape​

Ramapithecus (Rama’s ape) is no more. Another Hindu god has taken over the franchise; Ramapithecus is now subsumed under Sivapithecus, an earlier discovery, and is no longer a valid taxon name. The story is interesting from a history-of-science point of view. Ramapithecus used to be presented as the very first ape on the human line, postdating the split between humans and great apes, maybe ...

Sahelanthropus ​Tchadensis​
Sahelanthropus ​Tchadensis​

Sahelanthropus tchadensis is one of the oldest known species in the human family tree. This species lived sometime between 7 and 6 million years ago in West-Central Africa (Chad). Walking upright may have helped this species survive in diverse habitats, including forests and grasslands.

Sivapithecus​
Sivapithecus​

Sivapithecus (Shiva's Ape) (syn: Ramapithecus) is a genus of extinct apes. Fossil remains of animals now assigned to this genus, dated from 12.2 million years old in the Miocene, have been found since the 19th century in the Siwalik Hills of the Indian subcontinent.

image: boneroom.com
Southern ape​
Southern ape​

Answer: . An ape is any member of the Hominoidea superfamily of primates. Apes are divided into two groups, lesser apes and great apes. Humans, chimpanzees, gorillas, and … orangutans.

source: answers.com
Upright man​
Upright man​

Compared with modern Homo sapiens, which have only been around for the last 200,000 years, Homo erectus, or "upright man," had a long reign. The ancient ancestor of modern humans lived from 2 million years ago till about 100,000 years ago, possibly even 50,000 years ago.

image: pixshark.com