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Types of ice Cubes

Crescent
Crescent

Hoshizaki is the only manufacturer that makes a commercial ice maker that produces crescent cubes. Though it’s unique to one company, crescent ice has a fan base, both among restaurateurs and customers, who will seek it out.

source: katom.com
image: ccfse.com
Flakes
Flakes

The white flakes that can sometimes be seen in ice cubes are harmless carbonates. Step 1 Stir a packaged water softener like washing soda or borax into the water you are using to make ice cubes.

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Full Cubes
Full Cubes

Like full cubes, half-cube ice offers a relatively high ice-to-water ratio, which means a solid piece of ice that won't water down drinks as quickly, has more cooling power, and lowers production needs.

source: katom.com
Gourmet
Gourmet

Ice type names: Ice-O-Matic: Gourmet Ice; Manitowoc: Gourmet Ice; Hoshizaki: Top Hat Ice; Scotsman: Gourmet/Top Hat Ice. The scoop on the commercial ice maker: For Manitowoc, gourmet ice comes in a unique octagonal shape, while Ice-O-Matic, Hoshizaki, and Scostman have cylindrical ice that looks like a top hat.

source: katom.com
Half Cubes
Half Cubes

Half cubes are typically smaller versions of cube or dice ice, though the Hoshizaki equivalents are crescent cubes, which we cover later in this guide. Half-cube ice is considered the most versatile type of ice, which is why it shows up in restaurants, convenience stores, dispensers, and baggers.

source: katom.com
image: zesco.com
Nuggets (AKA
Nuggets (AKA

But nugget ice (also called “Pebble”, “Pellet”, “Chewable” or even “Sonic” ice) has a near-cult following. Sonic (the fast food joint) invested in Scotsman ice machines across the franchise two decades ago and ice chewers nationwide have become addicted to the chewy, airy ice.

source: abarabove.com

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