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Types of Intelligence

Bodily-Kinesthetic
Bodily-Kinesthetic

n. in multiple intelligence theory, refers to the intelligence to perform multiple tasks with coordination and handle finer objects with skill. This manifests in the ability to engage in sports activities like basketball or play musical instruments like the violin.

Bodily-Kinesthetic (Body Smart)
Bodily-Kinesthetic (Body Smart)

In this installment of my series on Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intellige nces, we’re going to look at what the bodily-kinesthetic intelligence is and how to identify it. Body-smart learners are action-oriented people who love to move and are very engaged with their bodies.

Cattell Culture Fair III
Cattell Culture Fair III

Cattell Culture Fair III. The Culture Fair Intelligence Test (CFIT) was constructed by Raymond B. Cattell, PhD, DSc in an attempt to produce a measure of cognitive abilities that accurately estimated intelligence devoid of sociocultural and environmental influences.

image: quazoo.com
Existential (Life Smart)
Existential (Life Smart)

Life's Larger Questions. Despite this avoidance on Gardner's part to definitively commit to existential intelligence, there are many who have accepted the presence of this intelligence as face and have attempted to clarify what it might look like if it were part of the MI array.

Interpersonal
Interpersonal

Interpersonal intelligence: includes the ability to interact with others effectively. Each of us has our own unique combination of the intelligences. For example, a writer may be skilled at using language (linguistic intelligence) but have difficulty with using his body or athletics (bodily/kinesthetic intelligence).

source: study.com
image: abook.org
Interpersonal (People Smart)
Interpersonal (People Smart)

Interpersonal intelligence refers to our ability to understand and relate to other people. People with interpersonal intelligence, such as Mahatma Gandhi and Cesar Chavez, are easily able to pick up on the feelings, mood, motivation, and intentions of those around them.

source: study.com
Interpersonal Intelligence
Interpersonal Intelligence

Interpersonal intelligence: includes the ability to interact with others effectively. Each of us has our own unique combination of the intelligences. For example, a writer may be skilled at using language (linguistic intelligence) but have difficulty with using his body or athletics (bodily/kinesthetic intelligence).

source: study.com
Intrapersonal
Intrapersonal

Intrapersonal intelligence: includes understanding and appreciating one's innermost feelings. We can think of multiple intelligences as the ridges that make up a fingerprint. That is, each person has a combination of the intelligences that is unique to the individual.

source: study.com
image: pixshark.com
Intrapersonal Intelligence
Intrapersonal Intelligence

Intrapersonal intelligence: includes understanding and appreciating one's innermost feelings. We can think of multiple intelligences as the ridges that make up a fingerprint. That is, each person has a combination of the intelligences that is unique to the individual.

source: study.com
Kinaesthetic Intelligence
Kinaesthetic Intelligence

What do Florence Griffith-Joyner, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Britney Spears all have in common? They all have bodily/kinesthetic intelligence. Learn...

source: study.com
Linguistic (Word Smart)
Linguistic (Word Smart)

Programming for Word Smart Learners In schools and in libraries creating programs for word smart learners is probably the easiest to do because it is the intelligence that is used the most to teach kids information.

Logic Intelligence
Logic Intelligence

Source: Logic. Intelligence has been defined in many different ways such as in terms of one's capacity for logic, abstract thought, understanding, self-awareness,communication, learning, emotional knowledge, memory, planning, creativity and problem solving.

source: quora.com
Logical-Mathematical
Logical-Mathematical

Logical/mathematical intelligence refers to our ability to think logically, reason, and identify connections. People with mathematical intelligence, such as Albert Einstein, are good at working with numbers, complex and abstract ideas, and scientific investigations.

source: study.com
Musical (Sound Smart)
Musical (Sound Smart)

Music smarts (or musical intelligence) is the ability to. perceive, discriminate, transform, and express musical. forms. This includes being sensitive to rhythm, pitch, melody, and timbre of music.

source: jist.com
Musical Intelligence
Musical Intelligence

What do Michael Jackson, Mozart, and Barbara Streisand all have in common? They all have musical intelligence. Learn more about musical...

source: study.com
Musical-Rhythmic and Harmonic
Musical-Rhythmic and Harmonic

Musical, Rhythmic and Harmonic. Musical intelligence deals mainly with sounds, rhythms, tones, and music. The people with high musical intelligence are usually able to sing, play musical instruments, and compose music.

source: prezi.com
image: chinpsy.com
Naturalist (Nature Smart)
Naturalist (Nature Smart)

Students with naturalist intelligence are those who seem to be in love with the natural world. They like to spend time there, they thrive there, they are skilled and confident and comfortable there, and they learn best there — in short, they are nature smart.

Naturalistic
Naturalistic

Naturalist intelligence is one of Howard Gardner's nine multiple intelligences. It involves how sensitive an individual is toward nature and the world around her. People who excel in this intelligence typically are interested in growing plants, taking care of animals or studying animals or plants.

source: thoughtco.com
Raven's Progressive Matrices
Raven's Progressive Matrices

Raven's Progressive Matrices (often referred to simply as Raven's Matrices) or RPM is a nonverbal group test typically used in educational settings. It is usually a 60-item test used in measuring abstract reasoning and regarded as a non-verbal estimate of fluid intelligence.

Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales
Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales

Administration of the four intelligence subtests takes approximately 20-25 minutes; administering the memory assessment adds only 10 minutes. Screening version is available. Derived from the RIAS, the Reynolds Intellectual Screening Test™ (RIST™) consists of one verbal subtest and one nonverbal subtest.

source: parinc.com
Spatial Intelligence
Spatial Intelligence

Spatial Intelligence is an area in the theory of multiple intelligences that deals with spatial judgment and the ability to visualize with the mind's eye.

StanfordBinet Intelligence Scales
StanfordBinet Intelligence Scales

The Stanford–Binet Intelligence Scales (or more commonly the Stanford–Binet) is an individually administered intelligence test that was revised from the original Binet–Simon Scale by Lewis M. Terman, a psychologist at Stanford University.

Thurstone's Primary Mental Abilities
Thurstone's Primary Mental Abilities

In this lesson, we will look into what primary and secondary mental abilities are, including fluid and crystallized intelligence and ways that they...

source: study.com
Verbal-Linguistic
Verbal-Linguistic

People with Linguistic intelligence love words. They enjoy reading and writing. Linguistic people are often gifted at learning languages. They appreciate the complexities of sentence structure, word structure, meaning and sound. They savor convoluted words and are quick at learning them. They possess rich vocabularies.

Visual-Spatial
Visual-Spatial

People with Visual/Spatial intelligence are very aware of their surroundings and are good at remembering images. People with Visual/Spatial intelligence are very aware of their surroundings and are good at remembering images.

Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale
Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale

Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) Originally developed in 1949, the WISC was intended as an improvement over the Wechsler–Bellevue Intelligence Scale of 1939, which in turn improved upon the older, uni-dimensional Binet Scale.

WoodcockJohnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities
WoodcockJohnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities

The Woodcock–Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities is a set of intelligence tests first developed in 1977 by Richard Woodcock and Mary E. Bonner Johnson. It was revised in 1989, again in 2001, and most recently in 2014; this last version is commonly referred to as the WJ IV.