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Types of iq Tests

Differential Ability Scales
Differential Ability Scales

The Differential Ability Scales (DAS) is a nationally normed (in the US), and individually administered battery of cognitive and achievement tests. Currently into its second edition (DAS-II), the test can be administered to children ages 2 years 6 months to 17 years 11 months across a range of developmental levels.

Peabody Individual Achievement Test
Peabody Individual Achievement Test

About the Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT-R NU) The Peabody is a standardized, nationally norm-referenced achievement test. The Normative Update was published in 1998, based on 1997 results.

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Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale
Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale

The Stanford-Binet Test traces its roots to the Binet-Simon Scale, a French device for identifying levels of intelligence, originally developed in an attempt to quantify human intelligence. The Binet-Simon Scale was developed by Alfred Binet and his student Theodore Simon.

Universal Nonverbal Intelligence
Universal Nonverbal Intelligence

Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test The Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (Bracken & McCallum, 1998) is a set of individually administered tasks designed to measure the cognitive abilities of children and adolescents (ages 5–17) who may be at a disadvantage in responding to traditional verbal or language-loaded tests.

Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale
Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale

Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) The WAIS was initially introduced in 1955 as an alternative to the Binet Scale to measure intelligence in adults. By the 1960's, the WAIS had surpassed even the newer version of the Binet Scale, the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, as the preeminent tool for testing adult intelligence levels.

Wechsler Individual Achievement Test
Wechsler Individual Achievement Test

The Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, or WIAT, is a test that measures a person's intelligence. The test can be taken by children and adults from age four to 85. Children and adolescents are often given the WIAT in order to identify areas where they may struggle or excel at in school.

Woodcock Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Disabilities
Woodcock Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Disabilities

The Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities is an intelligence test series (often referred to as IQ test). First developed in 1977 by Richard Woodcock and Mary Johnson, the Woodcock-Johnson test was revised in 1989 and 2001, and today’s most recent version is known as the WJ-III.

source: tests.com