A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of ira Plans

401(k) or 403(b) Offered by Your Employer
401(k) or 403(b) Offered by Your Employer

A 401(k), as well as a 403(b) and 457, is a qualified employer-sponsored retirement plan. If your employer does not offer a 401(k) or other sponsored plan, you should probably just begin saving in a Roth IRA or traditional IRA.

Health Savings Account
Health Savings Account

To get the benefits of an HSA, the law requires that the savings account be combined with a qualified high deductible health insurance plan which can cost less than other health insurance plans. In 2016, the minimum annual deductible of a qualified HSA plan for an individual is $1,300 and $2,600 for a family.

source: hsacenter.com
image: pendle.net
Individual Retirement Accounts •••
Individual Retirement Accounts •••

An individual retirement account (IRA) allows you to save money for retirement in a tax-advantaged way. An IRA is an account set up at a financial institution that allows an individual to save for retirement with tax-free growth or on a tax-deferred basis.

source: fidelity.com
Roth 401(k)
Roth 401(k)

Roth IRA vs. Roth 401(k) Now that you have an understanding of IRA plans and 401(k) accounts, read on to learn about the difference between a Roth IRA and a Roth 401(k). Roth IRA plan. An individual opens and contributes to an individual retirement account through a financial institution.

Roth IRA
Roth IRA

An IRA is essentially a “no fuss, no muss” situation. The IRA-based plans range from one with little employer involvement to ones that the employer establishes and funds. Individual Retirement Accounts. An IRA is the most basic sort of retirement arrangement.

source: irs.gov
Roth IRAs
Roth IRAs

An individual retirement account (IRA) allows you to save money for retirement in a tax-advantaged way. An IRA is an account set up at a financial institution that allows an individual to save for retirement with tax-free growth or on a tax-deferred basis.

source: fidelity.com
image: aaii.com
SEP IRA
SEP IRA

A SEP-IRA account is a traditional IRA and follows the same investment, distribution, and rollover rules as traditional IRAs. See the IRA FAQs. See also Publication 560, Publication 590-A and Publication 590-B for detailed information on SEP plans and SEP-IRAs.

source: irs.gov
Simple IRA
Simple IRA

A SIMPLE IRA plan (Savings Incentive Match PLan for Employees) allows employees and employers to contribute to traditional IRAs set up for employees. It is ideally suited as a start-up retirement savings plan for small employers not currently sponsoring a retirement plan.

source: irs.gov
Solo 401(k)
Solo 401(k)

The individual 401(k) - also known as the solo 401(k), the solo k, or uni-k - works much the same as traditional 401(k) plans offered by large companies, as well as SEP IRAs designed for the self-employed.

source: money.cnn.com
Type 1
Type 1

Types of Retirement Plans. English; More In Retirement Plans. News; Topics; ... SIMPLE IRA Plans (Savings Incentive Match Plans for Employees) SEP Plans ...

source: irs.gov
Type 2: Nondeductible IRA
Type 2: Nondeductible IRA

Traditional IRA vs. nondeductible IRA In many ways -- five, actually -- a nondeductible IRA is identical to a traditional IRA: The contribution limits for both are the same: The maximum allowable contribution for 2017 is $5,500, and if you're over the age of 50, the contribution ceiling is $6,500.

source: fool.com
Type 3: Roth IRA
Type 3: Roth IRA

An individual retirement account (IRA) allows you to save money for retirement in a tax-advantaged way. An IRA is an account set up at a financial institution that allows an individual to save for retirement with tax-free growth or on a tax-deferred basis.

source: fidelity.com

Related Question Categories