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Types of Knees

ACL Injury
ACL Injury

If your injury is minor, you may only need to put ice on your knee, elevate your leg, and stay off your feet for a while. You can reduce swelling by wrapping an ace bandage around your knee. Crutches can help to keep weight off your knee.

source: webmd.com
Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL)
Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL)

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of a pair of cruciate ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) in the human knee. The two ligaments are also called cruciform ligaments, as they are arranged in a crossed formation.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

One of the most common ways people hurt their knees is by injuring their ACL (anterior cruciate ligament). This is one of the bands of tissue that holds the bones together within your knee. It also helps to keep your knee stable.

source: webmd.com
Bursitis
Bursitis

Knee bursitis is inflammation of a small fluid-filled sac (bursa) situated near your knee joint. Bursae reduce friction and cushion pressure points between your bones and the tendons, muscles and skin near your joints.

Collateral Ligament Injuries
Collateral Ligament Injuries

The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is located on the inner aspect, or part, of your knee, outside the joint. Injury to the MCL is often called an MCL sprain or tear. MCL injuries are common in contact sports.

image: dxline.info
Dislocation
Dislocation

Knee dislocation is usually the result of: Car accidents. If you bang your knee against a hard surface like your dashboard, the force of the blow may be strong enough to dislocate your knee.

source: webmd.com
Fractures
Fractures

Treatment of knee fracture is decided by the classification of the fracture along with the degree of displacement, which can be either displaced or un-displaced. All un-displaced knee fractures can be treated by a groin to toe plaster cast.

Knee Bursitis
Knee Bursitis

Knee bursitis is inflammation of a small fluid-filled sac (bursa) situated near your knee joint. Bursae reduce friction and cushion pressure points between your bones and the tendons, muscles and skin near your joints.

Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL)
Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL)

The lateral ligament or lateral collateral ligament or LCL for short connects the femur or thigh bone to the top of the fibula bone in the lower leg. The ligament itself is a narrow strong cord of collagen fibres and its function is to provide stability to the outside of the knee.

Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL)
Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL)

What is a medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury? The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is located on the inner aspect, or part, of your knee, but it’s outside the joint itself. Ligaments hold bones together and add stability and strength to a joint.

image: dxline.info
Meniscal Tears
Meniscal Tears

In fact, a meniscal tear is one of the most frequently occurring cartilage injuries of the knee. So what is the meniscus? It's a piece of cartilage in your knee that cushions and stabilizes the joint.

source: webmd.com
Patellar Tendinitis
Patellar Tendinitis

Patellar tendonitis comes from repetitive stress on the knee, most often from overuse in sports or exercise. The repetitive stress on the knee creates tiny tears in the tendon that, over time, inflame and weaken the tendon.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL)
Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL)

The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a ligament within the knee. Ligaments are tough bands of tissue that connect bones. Ligaments are tough bands of tissue that connect bones. The PCL -- similar to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) -- connects the thigh bone (femur) to your shin bone (tibia). Although it is larger and stronger than the ACL, the PCL can be torn.

source: webmd.com
Tendon Tears
Tendon Tears

Injuries of the muscles and tendons surrounding the knee are caused by acute hyperflexion or hyperextension of the knee or by overuse. These injuries are called strains. Strains are graded similarly to sprains, with first-degree strains stretching muscle or tendon fibers but not tearing them, second-degree strains partially tearing the muscle tendon unit, and third-degree strains completely tearing it.

image: theknee.com
Tendonitis
Tendonitis

The result can be severe knee pain. What Is Tendinitis? Tendinitis is an inflammation of the tendon, a flexible band of tissue that connects the muscles to the bones. The pull of the muscles is transmitted to the bone by the tendons, which allows movement.

Torn Meniscus
Torn Meniscus

Unfortunately, it's quite common. In fact, a meniscal tear is one of the most frequently occurring cartilage injuries of the knee. So what is the meniscus? It's a piece of cartilage in your knee that cushions and stabilizes the joint. It protects the bones from wear and tear. But all it takes is a good twist of the knee to tear the meniscus.

source: webmd.com

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