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Types of ld

Acquired Brain Injury
Acquired Brain Injury

An acquired brain injury is defined as: Damage to the brain, which occurs after birth and is not related to a congenital or a degenerative disease. These impairments may be temporary or permanent and cause partial or functional disability or psychosocial maladjustment.

ADHD
ADHD

LD OnLine is the leading website on learning disabilities, learning disorders and differences. Parents and teachers of learning disabled children will find authoritative guidance on attention deficit disorder, ADD, ADHD, dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, dysnomia, reading difficulties, speech and related disorders.

source: ldonline.org
Auditory Processing Disorder (APD)
Auditory Processing Disorder (APD)

Auditory processing disorder (also known as central auditory processing disorder or CAPD) is a condition that makes it hard for kids to recognize subtle differences between sounds in words. It affects their ability to process what other people are saying.

Autism Spectrum Disorder
Autism Spectrum Disorder

Pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). This mouthful of a diagnosis included most children whose autism was more severe than Asperger's syndrome, but not as severe as autistic disorder. Autistic disorder. This older term is further along the autism spectrum than Asperger’s and PDD-NOS. It includes the same types of symptoms, but at a more intense level.

source: webmd.com
Deaf or Hard of Hearing
Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Instead, it has to do with how you identify yourself. Do you relate more closely to hearing people or deaf people? Many medically hard of hearing people consider themselves culturally deaf. Sometimes, this difference between cultural deafness and those with profound hearing loss can be indicated in the way the word "deaf" is written.

Dyscalculia
Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia, sometimes known as "math dyslexia," affects the ability to make sense of and work with numbers. Learn about math learning disabilities and disorders, including symptoms and treatment. Learn about math learning disabilities and disorders, including symptoms and treatment.

Dysgraphia
Dysgraphia

Dysgraphia is a learning disability that affects writing abilities. It can manifest itself as difficulties with spelling, poor handwriting and trouble putting thoughts on paper. Because writing requires a complex set of motor and information processing skills, saying a student has dysgraphia is not sufficient.

source: ldonline.org
Dyslexia
Dyslexia

Dyslexia Affects reading and related language-based processing skills. The severity of this specific learning disability can differ in each individual but can affect reading fluency, decoding, reading comprehension, recall, writing, spelling, and sometimes speech and can exist along with other related disorders.

Intellectual Disability
Intellectual Disability

Intellectual disabilities and learning challenges aren't the same thing. See what the difference is and why one gets confused for the other. An expert explains.

Mental Health Conditions
Mental Health Conditions

Some people don't understand there is a difference between a learning disability and mental health problems. We explore what the differences are between learning disability and mental health, and whether it's possible to have both.

source: mencap.org.uk
image: gov.uk
Non-Verbal Learning Disabilities
Non-Verbal Learning Disabilities

Non-Verbal Learning Disabilities Has trouble interpreting nonverbal cues like facial expressions or body language and may have poor coordination. Non-Verbal Learning Disability (NVD or NVLD), is a disorder which is usually characterized by a significant discrepancy between higher verbal skills and weaker motor, visual-spatial and social skills.

Physical Disability
Physical Disability

In Federal law, under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the term is “specific learning disability,” one of 13 categories of disability under that law. “Learning Disabilities” is an “umbrella” term describing a number of other, more specific learning disabilities, such as dyslexia and dysgraphia.

Vision Impairment
Vision Impairment

The definition of vision impairment by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says a visually impaired person’s eyesight cannot be corrected to a “normal level”.

Visual Perceptual/Visual Motor Deficit
Visual Perceptual/Visual Motor Deficit

Visual Perceptual/Visual Motor Deficit Affects the understanding of information that a person sees, or the ability to draw or copy. A characteristic seen in people with learning disabilities such as Dysgraphia or Non-verbal LD, it can result in missing subtle differences in shapes or printed letters, losing place frequently, struggles with cutting, holding pencil too tightly, or poor eye/hand coordination.

image: ldatx.org