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Types of Leafy Greens

Chard​
Chard​

What Is Swiss Chard? Talena Keltner. First and foremost, Swiss chard is not kale. Yes, it looks like kale, and yes, it's another leafy green, but it is a different plant altogether.

image: pixabay.com
Collard ​Greens​
Collard ​Greens​

Collard greens are a type of leafy green vegetable that is common in southern U.S. cooking. Collards feature dark green leaves with tough stems. They're a member of the same group of plants that also includes kale, turnips and mustard.

Kale​
Kale​

In the food world, the biggest celebrity of all might be kale—the Shakira of salads, the Lady Gaga of leafy greens. And yes, it really does have plenty of benefits—including high levels of folate and more calcium, gram for gram, than a cup of milk. But it’s actually not the healthiest green on the block.

source: eatthis.com
Microgreen​
Microgreen​

Whether it’s walking to work, installing a low-flow showerhead, or recycling more often, it’s important to live a little more mindfully. The same holds true for your diet. Saturated in an alphabet of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, leafy greens are the MVPs of the supermarket produce section.

source: shape.com
Mustard ​Greens​
Mustard ​Greens​

Dark green leafy vegetables are great sources of nutrition. Salad greens, kale and spinach are rich in vitamins A, C, E and K, and broccoli, bok choy and mustard are also rich in many of the B-vitamins.

source: ars.usda.gov
Romaine ​Lettuce​
Romaine ​Lettuce​

The leafy greens community in Arizona and California are committed to working with the government to learn how romaine lettuce came to be responsible for this outbreak and what can be done to prevent future outbreaks.

Spinach​
Spinach​

Dark green leafy vegetables are nutritional powerhouses filled with vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients. They are rich in chlorophyll, which alkalinizes the blood, and fiber, which keeps the colon healthy.