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Types of Learning Theories

Aural (Auditory-Musical)
Aural (Auditory-Musical)

Learning and Techniques. If you are an aural learner, use sound, rhyme, and music in your learning. Focus on using aural content in your association and visualization. Use sound recordings to provide a background and help you get into visualizations.

Behaviorism
Behaviorism

Learning is therefore defined as a change in behavior in the learner. Lots of (early) behaviorist work was done with animals (e.g. Pavlov’s dogs) and generalized to humans [3]. Behaviorism precedes the cognitivist worldview.

Cognitivism
Cognitivism

Cognitivism focuses on the inner mental activities – opening the “black box" of the human mind is valuable and necessary for understanding how people learn. Mental processes such as thinking, memory, knowing, and problem-solving need to be explored.

Connectivism
Connectivism

Connectivism [1][2] Connectivism is a learning theory that explains how Internet technologies have created new opportunities for people to learn and share information across the World Wide Web and among themselves.

Constructivism
Constructivism

2 years ago • Constructivist Theories, Paradigms and Perspectives • 0 Constructivism as a paradigm or worldview posits that learning is an active, constructive process. The learner is an information constructor.

Physical (Kinesthetic)
Physical (Kinesthetic)

Kinesthetic learning occurs as students engage a physical activity: learning by doing, exploring, discovering. Kinesthetic learning is one of four learning styles defined by Neil Fleming and co-workers (see Fleming, N., and Mills, C., 1992, Not Another Inventory, Rather a Catalyst for Reflection,Published in: To Improve the Academy, Vol. 11, Page 137): visual, auditory, reading/writing, and kinesthetic.

Verbal (Linguistic)
Verbal (Linguistic)

Linguistic intelligence is better known as verbal intelligence, and this is where an individual responds best through auditory methods of teaching. Essentially, this is verbal learning, where a student will learn most efficiently from listening to people and taking in information. It means an individual has an ability to solve complex problems, come to conclusions and learn overall using language alone.

Visual (Spatial)
Visual (Spatial)

The Visual (Spatial) Learning Style If you use the visual style, you prefer using images, pictures, colors, and maps to organize information and communicate with others. You can easily visualize objects, plans and outcomes in your mind's eye.