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Types of Locomotives

Catch Me ​Who Can​
Catch Me ​Who Can​

Catch Me Who Can was the fourth and last steam railway locomotive created by Richard Trevithick, (after those at Coalbrookdale, Penydarren ironworks and Wylam colliery).

Diesel–​Electric Transmission​
Diesel–​Electric Transmission​

Diesel–electric transmission is used on railways by diesel electric locomotives and diesel electric multiple units, as electric motors are able to supply full torque at 0 RPM. Diesel–electric systems are also used in submarines and surface ships and some land vehicles.

image: crrcgc.cc
Fairlie ​Locomotive​
Fairlie ​Locomotive​

Double Fairlie locomotive Diagram of a Fairlie locomotive Fairlie's answer was a double-ended steam locomotive, carrying all its fuel and water aboard the locomotive and with every axle driven.

Fire-Tube ​Boiler​
Fire-Tube ​Boiler​

A fire-tube boiler is a type of boiler in which hot gases pass from a fire through one or (many) more tubes running through a sealed container of water. The heat of the gases is transferred through the walls of the tubes by thermal conduction, heating the water and ultimately creating steam.

Killingworth ​Locomotives​
Killingworth ​Locomotives​

Killingworth Billy Billy at Stephenson Railway Museum The Killingworth Billy or Billy (not to be confused with Puffing Billy) was built to Stephenson's design by Robert Stephenson and Company – it was thought to have been built in 1826 but further archeological investigation in 2018 revised its construction date back by a further decade to 1816.

Locomotion ​No 1​
Locomotion ​No 1​

Locomotion No. 1 (originally named Active) is the first steam locomotive to carry passengers on a public rail line, the Stockton and Darlington Railway. Built by George and Robert Stephenson's company Robert Stephenson and Company in 1825.

image: maas.museum
Novelty​
Novelty​

Novelty was an early steam locomotive built by John Ericsson and John Braithwaite to take part in the Rainhill Trials in 1829. It was an 0-2-2WT locomotive and is now regarded as the first tank engine.

Pilot​
Pilot​

In railroading, the pilot (also known as a cowcatcher or cattle catcher) is the device mounted at the front of a locomotive to deflect obstacles on the track that might otherwise derail the train. In addition to the pilot, small metal bars called life-guards, rail guards or guard irons (UK) are provided immediately in front of the wheels.

image: lionel.com
Puffing Billy​
Puffing Billy​

Puffing Billy is the world's oldest surviving steam locomotive, constructed in 1813–1814 by coal viewer William Hedley, enginewright Jonathan Forster and blacksmith Timothy Hackworth for Christopher Blackett, the owner of Wylam Colliery near Newcastle upon Tyne, in the United Kingdom.

Railway air ​Brake​
Railway air ​Brake​

A railway air brake is a railway brake power braking system with compressed air as the operating medium. Modern trains rely upon a fail-safe air brake system that is based upon a design patented by George Westinghouse on March 5, 1868.

Salamanca​
Salamanca​

Salamanca was the first commercially successful steam locomotive, built in 1812 by Matthew Murray of Holbeck, for the edge railed Middleton Railway between Middleton and Leeds. It was the first to have two cylinders.

Sans Pareil​
Sans Pareil​

Sans Pareil is a steam locomotive built by Timothy Hackworth which took part in the 1829 Rainhill Trials on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, held to select a builder of locomotives. The name is French and means 'peerless' or 'without equal'.

image: alamy.com
Steam Engine​
Steam Engine​

The steam powered engine is the heart of the steam locomotive. In order to understand how the locomotive works, it is important to first understand how the steam engine operates. This involves water and fire, which is used to create heat.

Stephenson's ​Rocket​
Stephenson's ​Rocket​

Stephenson's Rocket was an early steam locomotive of 0-2-2 wheel arrangement. It was built for, and won, the Rainhill Trials held by the Liverpool & Manchester Railway in 1829 to choose the best design to power the railway. Rocket was designed by Robert Stephenson in 1829, and built at the Forth Street Works of his company in Newcastle upon Tyne.

Third Rail​
Third Rail​

A third rail is a method of providing electric power to a railway locomotive or train, through a semi-continuous rigid conductor placed alongside or between the rails of a railway track.

image: ebay.com
Wylam Dilly​
Wylam Dilly​

Wylam Dilly is the second oldest surviving railway locomotive in the world; it was built circa 1815 by William Hedley and Timothy Hackworth for Christopher Blackett, the owner of Wylam colliery, west of Newcastle upon Tyne.

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