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Types of Lumber

Ash​
Ash​

Green Ash and Black Ash trees are preferentially attacked by the insects, followed by White Ash and Blue Ash. White Ash has excellent shock resistance, and along with hickory (Carya spp.), it is one of the most commonly used hardwoods for tool handles in North America—particularly in shovels and hammers where toughness and impact resistance is important.

Birch​
Birch​

Birch is a hardwood harvested in most of the Northern Hemisphere. And even though it is a relative to the oak, the lumber is much harder than oak. Birch is widely used in the cabinet industry, mostly because it makes superior plywood that is stable, affordable and readily available in most home improvement stores.

Coast ​Redwood​
Coast ​Redwood​

It grows in a very limited area on the Pacific coast of northwestern United States, where heavy rainfall and cool, damp air create a unique environment for these trees. A related species, (Sequoiadendron giganteum), sometimes known as Giant Sequoia or Wellingtonia, produces similar lumber.

Fir​
Fir​

Fir has tight, close grain lines. Pine has broad grain lines that wander, making it far weaker than fir. The soft wood between the grain lines shrinks and expands, making the wood cup or twist. Fir has little soft grain. Pine has much more soft grain. For stability and strength, fir is much less prone to warping or twisting, and much stronger than pine.

Mahogany​
Mahogany​

Generally speaking, the harder the wood the easier it is to finish and polish. Harder woods create good, solid long-lasting joinery in furniture. The hardness of wood varies with the direction of the wood grain, and varies from piece to piece.

Maple​
Maple​

Generally speaking, the harder the wood the easier it is to finish and polish. Harder woods create good, solid long-lasting joinery in furniture. The hardness of wood varies with the direction of the wood grain, and varies from piece to piece. So a Janka rating is an average of numerous tests performed on all directions and numerous pieces.

Oak​
Oak​

Generally speaking, the harder the wood the easier it is to finish and polish. Harder woods create good, solid long-lasting joinery in furniture. The hardness of wood varies with the direction of the wood grain, and varies from piece to piece. So a Janka rating is an average of numerous tests performed on all directions and numerous pieces.

Pine​
Pine​

Southern yellow pine lumber should be great material for building lofts/bunkbeds. Look for straight grain and avoid large knots, around which the wood may twist as it dries to indoor equalibrium moisture content. Even better is to buy wider boards like 2×10 or 2×12 and rip the boards you need from them, using the clear straight-grained parts.

Teak​
Teak​

Teak wood has a leather-like smell when it is freshly milled. It is particularly valued for its durability and water resistance, and is used for boat building, exterior construction, veneer, furniture, carving, turnings, and other small wood projects.

image: fordaq.com
Western ​Redcedar​
Western ​Redcedar​

J&W Lumber offers a full selection of Rough and Surfaced Western Red Cedar lumber that can be used for just about any outdoor project. If you’re aiming to have one of the best-looking projects in your neighborhood, then choose one of the world’s most beautiful woods – Western Red Cedar.

source: jwlumber.com

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