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Types of Lung Infections

A Asbestosis Asthma
A Asbestosis Asthma

Asbestosis is a chronic disease characterized by scarring in the lungs, which leads to long-term breathing complications. It is caused exclusively by exposure to asbestos, but it is usually not diagnosed until decades after the exposure occurred.

source: asbestos.com
B Bronchiectasis Bronchitis
B Bronchiectasis Bronchitis

www.lung.org > Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Bronchiectasis Bronchiectasis Symptoms, Causes & Risk Factors Some of the signs and symptoms of a bronchiectasis exacerbation are the same as those of acute bronchitis, but some are different.

source: lung.org
C
C

Learn about the signs and symptoms of a lung infection, often pneumonia, in people with COPD and when you should call your doctor.

image: nbcnews.com
Chronic Bronchitis
Chronic Bronchitis

Acute bronchitis: This is the more common one. Symptoms last for a few weeks, but it doesn’t usually cause any problems past that. Chronic bronchitis: This one is more serious, in that it keeps coming back or doesn’t go away at all.

source: webmd.com
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease refers to two long-term lung diseases -- chronic bronchitis and emphysema-- that often occur together. COPD makes it hard for you to breathe. Tubes called airways carry air into and out of your lungs.

source: webmd.com
Cystic Fibrosis/Bronchiectasis
Cystic Fibrosis/Bronchiectasis

The incidence of lung colonization and infection due to NTM in patients with cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis is increasing worldwide, but data on patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis has been limited. The goal of researchers was to determine the prevalence of NTM and factors associated with the isolation of NTM.

Emphysema
Emphysema

People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have inflamed and narrowed airways and damaged air sacs, which makes them more prone to developing lung infections, particularly pneumonia. How Lung Infection Occurs. Pneumonia happens when bacteria, viruses, and less commonly fungi collect in a person's air sacs and begin to grow.

H Hantavirus
H Hantavirus

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is a severe, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease in humans caused by infection with hantaviruses. Anyone who comes into contact with rodents that carry hantaviruses is at risk of HPS. Rodent infestation in and around the home remains the primary risk for hantavirus exposure. Even healthy individuals are at risk for HPS infection if exposed to the virus.

source: cdc.gov
image: cdc.gov
I Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Influenza
I Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Influenza

Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) The most common type of PF is IPF, which stands for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This means this type of PF has no known cause. Approximately 50,000 new cases of IPF are diagnosed each year. Most IPF patients first start noticing symptoms between the ages of 50 and 70 years old. It is more common in men, but the number of cases of IPF in women is on the rise.

source: lung.org
L Lung Cancer
L Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is a group of diseases characterized by abnormal growths (cancers) that started in the lungs. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women and men both in the United States and throughout the world.

Lower Respiratory Infections: Bronchitis, Bronchiolitis and Pneumonia
Lower Respiratory Infections: Bronchitis, Bronchiolitis and Pneumonia

Acute lower respiratory infections Acute lower respiratory infections include pneumonia (infection of the lung alveoli), as well as infections affecting the airways such as acute bronchitis and bronchiolitis, influenza and whooping cough.

P
P

People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have inflamed and narrowed airways and damaged air sacs, which makes them more prone to developing lung infections, particularly pneumonia. How Lung Infection Occurs. Pneumonia happens when bacteria, viruses, and less commonly fungi collect in a person's air sacs and begin to grow.

image: hubpages.com
Pleural Effusion
Pleural Effusion

Pleural drain: For pleural effusions that keep coming back, you may get a long-term catheter inserted through your skin into the pleural space. You can drain the pleural effusion at home. Your doctor will tell you how and when to do that.

source: webmd.com
image: quora.com
Pneumonia
Pneumonia

Pneumonia is an infection in your lungs, and it can keep you in bed feeling very sick. It's usually caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi. In the U.S. about 30% of pneumonias are viral.

source: webmd.com
R Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)
R Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

Respiratory syncytial virus is a common, and very contagious, virus that infects the respiratory tract of most children before their second birthday. For most babies and young children, the infection causes nothing more than a cold.

source: webmd.com
Upper Respiratory Infections
Upper Respiratory Infections

Upper respiratory infections are one of the most frequent causes for a doctor visit with varying symptoms ranging from runny nose, sore throat, cough, to breathing difficulty, and lethargy. In the United States, upper respiratory infections are the most common illness leading to missing school or work.