A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Magnitude

1 – Sirius
1 – Sirius

Sirius A is about twice as massive as the Sun (M ☉) and has an absolute visual magnitude of +1.42. It is 25 times more luminous than the Sun but has a significantly lower luminosity than other bright stars such as Canopus or Rigel.

2 – Canopus (Alpha Carinae)
2 – Canopus (Alpha Carinae)

Canopus or Alpha Carinae (Alp Car) is the brightest naked eye star in the constellation Carina. With an apparent magnitude of -0.62, Canopus is the 2nd brightest star in the entire sky (see: 50 Brightest Stars ).

3 – Rigil Kentaurus (Alpha Centauri)
3 – Rigil Kentaurus (Alpha Centauri)

Alpha Centauri A, also known as Rigil Kentaurus, is the principal member, or primary, of the binary system, being slightly larger and more luminous than the Sun.

4 – Arcturus
4 – Arcturus

Arcturus has an Apparent magnitude (visual magnitude) of â 0.04, but note it is a variable star.

5 – Vega
5 – Vega

Under the Vega system for measuring the brightness of astronomical brightness, the star Vega is defined to have an apparent magnitude of zero as measured through all filters, although this is only an approximation e.g. its actual brightness has been measured to be 0.03 in the V (visual) band.

7 – Rigel
7 – Rigel

The apparent visual magnitude of Rigel is 0.13, making it on average the seventh-brightest star in the celestial sphere excluding the Sun—just fainter than Capella. It is an irregular pulsating variable with a visual range of magnitude 0.05–0.18.

image: steemit.com
8 – Procyon
8 – Procyon

Procyon is a binary star system with a bright primary component, Procyon A, having an apparent magnitude of 0.34, and a faint companion, Procyon B, at magnitude 10.7. The pair orbit each other with a period of 40.82 years along an elliptical orbit with an eccentricity of 0.407.

9 – Achernar
9 – Achernar

Achernar / ˈ eɪ k ər n ɑːr / is the name of the primary (or 'A') component of the binary system designated Alpha Eridani (α Eridani, abbreviated Alf Eri, α Eri), which is the brightest 'star' or point of light in, and lying at the southern tip of, the constellation of Eridanus, and the tenth-brightest in the night sky.