A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Mammals

Anteater
Anteater

Anteater is a common name for the five extant mammal species of the suborder Vermilingua[1] (meaning "worm tongue") commonly known for eating ants and termites.[2] The individual species have other names in English and other languages.

Ape
Ape

The family Hominidae (hominids), the great apes, includes three extant species of orangutans and their subspecies, two extant species of gorillas and their subspecies, two extant species of chimpanzees and their subspecies, and one extant species of humans in a single extant subspecies.

image: pixabay.com
Armadillo
Armadillo

The largest species, the giant armadillo, can be the size of a small pig and weigh up to 54 kg (119 lb), and can be 150 cm (59 in) long. They are prolific diggers. Many species use their sharp claws to dig for food, such as grubs, and to dig dens.

Bat
Bat

The second largest order of mammals, bats comprise about 20% of all classified mammal species worldwide, with over 1,200 species. These were traditionally divided into two suborders: the largely fruit-eating megabats, and the echolocating microbats.

image: edupic.net
Bear
Bear

Bears Are Mammals Bears are large, strong omnivores. ... Many people often think of bears as big, ferocious creatures that are brown, black or white. ... Bears come in many different colors, shape, and sizes and they live all over the world, except Antarctica and Australia. ... There are eight different species of bears. ...

source: kidzone.ws
image: kidzone.ws
Camelids
Camelids

Camelids are large, strictly herbivorous animals with slender necks and long legs. They differ from ruminants in a number of ways. Their dentition show traces of vestigial central incisors in the upper jaw, and the third incisors have developed into canine-like tusks.

image: quazoo.com
Canidae
Canidae

The biological family Canidae /ˈkænɪdiː/ [3] is a lineage of carnivorans that includes domestic dogs, wolves, foxes, jackals, dingoes, and many other extant and extinct dog-like mammals.

Carnivores
Carnivores

Carnivores rank high on the scale of intelligence among mammals. The brain is large in relation to the body, an indication of their superior mental powers. For this reason, these animals are among the easiest to train for entertainment purposes, as pets, or as hunting companions.

Deer
Deer

Adult male deer in Florida average 115 pounds, but can reach 190 pounds or more in North Florida. The smaller females average 90 pounds with larger females weighing 120 pounds or more. The Key deer subspecies (Odocoileus virginianus clavium) is notably smaller, averaging just 27 inches at the shoulders and weighing as much as 80 pounds.

source: myfwc.com
Earless Seal
Earless Seal

The earless seals, phocids or true seals are one of the three main groups of mammals within the seal lineage, Pinnipedia.All true seals are members of the family Phocidae / ˈ f oʊ s ɪ d iː /.

Echidna
Echidna

Echidnas (/ɪˈkɪdnə/), sometimes known as spiny anteaters, belong to the family Tachyglossidae in the monotreme order of egg-laying mammals. The four extant species, together with the platypus, are the only surviving members of the order Monotremata and are the only living mammals that lay eggs.

Erinaceidae
Erinaceidae

Erinaceidae is a family in the order Eulipotyphla. Until recently, it was assigned to the order Erinaceomorpha, which has been subsumed with the paraphyletic ...

Eutheria
Eutheria

Except for the Virginia opossum, from North America, which is a metatherian, all post-Miocene mammals indigenous to Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America north of Mexico are eutherians. Extant eutherians, their last common ancestor, and all extinct descendants of that ancestor are members of Placentalia.

Even-Toed Ungulates
Even-Toed Ungulates

The even-toed ungulates (Artiodactyla, from Greek ἄρτιος (ártios), meaning 'even', and δάκτυλος (dáktylos), meaning 'finger/toe') are ungulates (hoofed animals) whose weight is borne equally by the third and fourth toes. By contrast, odd-toed ungulates, such as horses, bear their weight primarily on their third toes.

Felidae
Felidae

The Felidae's closest relatives are thought to be the Asiatic linsangs. Together with the Viverridae, hyenas, mongooses, and Madagascar carnivores, they form the suborder Feliformia. Most cat species share a genetic anomaly that prevents them from tasting sweetness. Most cat species have a haploid number of 18 or 19.

Gerbil
Gerbil

Yes.A gerbil has fur on it and mammals have fur.

Hamster
Hamster

Most hamsters are strictly solitary. If housed together, acute and chronic stress may occur, and they may fight fiercely, sometimes fatally. Dwarf hamster species may tolerate conspecifics.Russian hamsters form close, monogamous bonds with their mates, and if separated, they may become very depressed.

image: wallup.net
Hedgehog
Hedgehog

A hedgehog is any of the spiny mammals of the subfamily Erinaceinae, in the eulipotyphlan family Erinaceidae. There are seventeen species of hedgehog in five genera, found through parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa, and in New Zealand by introduction.

Horses
Horses

Horse (Equus caballus), a hoofed, herbivorous mammal of the family Equidae. It comprises a single species, Equus caballus, whose numerous varieties are called breeds.

Hyena
Hyena

The brown hyena lives in Southern Africa and western coastal deserts, where it is called the beach, or strand, wolf. Birds and their eggs, insects, and fruit are staples, but leftovers from kills made by lions, cheetahs, and spotted hyenas are very important seasonally. Small mammals and reptiles are occasionally killed.

image: quazoo.com
Hyrax
Hyrax

DNA evidence supports this hypothesis, and the small modern hyraxes share numerous features with elephants, such as toenails, excellent hearing, sensitive pads on their feet, small tusks, good memory, higher brain functions compared to other similar mammals, and the shape of some of their bones.

Lagomorphs
Lagomorphs

The lagomorphs are the members of the taxonomic order Lagomorpha, of which there are two living families: the Leporidae (hares and rabbits) and the Ochotonidae (pikas). The name of the order is derived from the Ancient Greek lagos (λαγώς, "hare") +morphē (μορφή, "form").

Lemurs
Lemurs

A new assessment of lemurs reveals the primates are probably the most endangered group of vertebrates on Earth, beating out all other mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds and bony fish for the dismal distinction.

image: forbes.com
Leporids
Leporids

Leporidae is a family of mammals that include rabbits and hares, over 60 species in all. The Latin word Leporidae means "those that resemble lepus" (hare). Together with the pikas, the Leporidae constitute the mammalian order Lagomorpha.

image: pixolo.it
Manis
Manis

Manis is a genus of pangolins. Species. Known fossil species. Asian giant pangolin † ...

Marsupial
Marsupial

Some species resemble higher mammals and are examples of convergent evolution. The extinct Thylacine strongly resembled the placental wolf, hence its nickname "Tasmanian wolf". Flying and the associated ability to glide occurred both with marsupials (as with sugar gliders) and some higher mammals (as with flying squirrels), which developed independently. Other groups such as the kangaroo, however, do not have placental counterparts.

image: ayay.co.uk
Mongoose
Mongoose

Mongoose is the popular English name for 29 of the 34 species in the 14 genera of the family Herpestidae, which are small feliform carnivorans native to southern Eurasia and mainland Africa.

Monotreme
Monotreme

Monotremes are traditionally referred to as the mammalian subclass Prototheria. The only surviving examples of monotremes are all indigenous to Australia and New Guinea, although there is evidence that they were once more widespread. The existing monotreme species are the platypus and four species of echidnas.

Mustelids
Mustelids

The Mustelidae are a family of carnivorous mammals, including weasels, badgers, otters, martens, mink, and wolverines, among others. Mustelids are diverse and the largest family in the order Carnivora. The internal classification is still disputed, with rival proposals containing between two and eight subfamilies. One study, published in 2008, questions the long-accepted Mustelinae subfamily, and suggests that the Mustelidae consist of four major clades and three much smaller lineages.

image: snipview.com
Oceanic Dolphin
Oceanic Dolphin

Oceanic dolphin Temporal range: ... Various methods of feeding exist among and within oceanic species, some apparently exclusive to a single population. Fish and squid are the main food, but the false killer whale and the killer whale also feed on other marine mammals. Killer whales on occasion also hunt whales larger than themselves. One common feeding method is herding, where a pod squeezes ...

Odd-Toed Ungulates
Odd-Toed Ungulates

Members of the order Perissodactyla, otherwise known as odd-toed ungulates, are mammals characterized by an odd number of toes and by hindgut fermentation with somewhat simple stomachs.

Opossum
Opossum

Opossums do possess a placenta, but it is short-lived, simple in structure, and, unlike that of placental mammals, is not fully functional. The young are therefore born at a very early stage, although the gestation period is similar to many other small marsupials, at only 12 to 14 days.

Otter
Otter

Otters are carnivorous mammals in the subfamily Lutrinae. The 13 extant otter species are all semiaquatic, aquatic or marine, with diets based on fish and invertebrates.

image: thevlm.org
Pachydermata
Pachydermata

Pachydermata (from two Greek words παχύς pachys, "thick" and δερμα derma, "skin", meaning 'thick skin') is an obsolete order of mammals described by Gottlieb Storr, Georges Cuvier and others, at one time recognized by many systematists.

Pinniped
Pinniped

Male pinniped strategies for reproductive success vary between defending females, ... Return to the Sea: The Life and Evolutionary Times of Marine Mammals.

Placentals
Placentals

Placental mammal, (infraclass Eutheria), any member of the mammalian group characterized by the presence of a placenta, which facilitates exchange of nutrients and wastes between the blood of the mother and that of the fetus. The placentals include all living mammals except marsupials and monotremes.

Porpoise
Porpoise

Porpoises are a group of fully aquatic marine mammals that are sometimes referred to as mereswine, all of which are classified under the family Phocoenidae, parvorder Odontoceti (toothed whales). There are six extant species of porpoise. They are small toothed whales that are very closely related to oceanic dolphins.

Primate
Primate

Primate, in zoology, any mammal of the group that includes the lemurs, lorises, tarsiers, monkeys, apes, and humans. The order Primates, with its 300 or more species, is the third most diverse order of mammals, after rodents (Rodentia) and bats (Chiroptera).

Proboscideans
Proboscideans

Proboscidean (order Proboscidea), any of the group of mammals that includes elephants and their extinct relatives such as mammoths and mastodons.

Rhinoceros
Rhinoceros

Rhinoceros (family Rhinocerotidae), plural rhinoceroses, rhinoceros, or rhinoceri, any of five or six species of giant, horn-bearing herbivores that include some of the largest living land mammals.

Rodent
Rodent

Rodents (from Latin rodere, "to gnaw") are mammals of the order Rodentia, which are characterized by a single pair of continuously growing incisors in each of the upper and lower jaws.

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Sea Cows
Sea Cows

Steller's sea cow was named after Georg Wilhelm Steller, a naturalist who discovered the species in 1741 on Vitus Bering's Great Northern Expedition when the crew became shipwrecked on Bering Island. Much of what is known about its behavior comes from Steller's observations on the island, documented in his posthumous publication On the Beasts of the Sea.

Sea Lion
Sea Lion

Sea lion. Sea lions are sea mammals characterized by external ear flaps, long foreflippers, the ability to walk on all fours, and short, thick hair, big chest and belly. Together with the fur seals, they comprise the family Otariidae, eared seals, which contains six extant and one extinct species (the Japanese sea lion) in five genera.

image: pixshark.com
Shrew
Shrew

A shrew (family Soricidae) is a small mole-like mammal classified in the order Eulipotyphla. True shrews are not to be confused with West Indies shrews, treeshrews, otter shrews, or elephant shrews, which belong to different families or orders.

Simian
Simian

The simian and tarsier lines of haplorhines diverged about 60 million years ago (during the Cenozoic era). Forty million years ago, simians from Africa colonized South America, giving rise to the New World monkeys. The remaining simians (catarrhines) split 25 million years ago into apes and Old World monkeys.

Skunks
Skunks

Skunks are North and South American mammals in the family Mephitidae. Not related to polecats which are in the weasel family, the closest Old World relative to the skunk is the stink badger. The animals are known for their ability to spray a liquid with a strong unpleasant smell.

Sloth
Sloth

Sloths are mammals classified in the families Megalonychidae (two-toed sloths) and Bradypodidae (three-toed sloths). There are six extant species of sloths. They are named after the capital sin of sloth because they seem slow and lazy at first glance; however, their usual idleness is due to metabolic adaptations for conserving energy.

Squirrel
Squirrel

Squirrels are members of the family Sciuridae, a family that includes small or medium-size rodents. The squirrel family includes tree squirrels, ground squirrels, chipmunks, marmots (including woodchucks), flying squirrels, and prairie dogs amongst other rodents.

Talpidae
Talpidae

Mole (animal) Moles are small mammals adapted to a subterranean lifestyle (i.e., fossorial). They have cylindrical bodies, velvety fur, very small, inconspicuous ears and eyes, reduced hindlimbs and short, powerful forelimbs with large paws adapted for digging.

Ungulate
Ungulate

UNGULATE: The Modern Definition. For many years, "ungulates" were grouped together based on a relationship to an extinct ancestor, not on the basis of hooves. The morphological family tree (above) was the accepted classification of mammals, and was continually being fine-tuned as new fossil evidence was uncovered.