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Types of Mexican Dances

Bachata
Bachata

Bachata Sensual is a between dance with strict follow and lead principles. The dance is an interpretation of the music with mostly circular movements and body waves. When the music has stronger beats, however, the dance also uses isolations and dips.

Cha Cha Cha
Cha Cha Cha

The cha-cha-chá, or simply cha-cha in the U.S., is a dance of Cuban origin. It is danced to the music of the same name introduced by Cuban composer and violinist Enrique Jorrin in the early 1950s. This rhythm was developed from the danzón-mambo. The name of the dance is an onomatopoeia derived from the shuffling sound of the dancers' feet.

Concheros
Concheros

The Concheros dance, also known as the Chichimecas, Aztecas and Mexicas, is an important traditional dance and ceremony which has been performed in Mexico since early in the colonial period. It presents syncretic features both pre-Hispanic and Christian.

Danza de los Diablos
Danza de los Diablos

The Diablada or Danza de los Diablos (English: Dance of the Demons), is an original and typical dance from the region of Oruro in Bolivia. characterized by the mask and devil suit worn by the performers.

Danza de los Viejitos
Danza de los Viejitos

Danza de los Viejitos is said have begun as a dance in the Purepecha Region. The men that perform this dance are known as "Danzantes" or "Dancers." This dance was danced by the Purepecha people four men to represent fire, water, earth, and air.

Danza del Venado
Danza del Venado

La Danza del Venado, known as the Deer Dance, hails from Sonora, Mexico. With pre-Hispanic origins, this is a ritualistic dance performed primarily by the Yaqui people of Mexico. The dance illustrates a deer hunt, with dancers playing the roles of the hunters and the dying deer itself.

Fandango
Fandango

Fandango is a lively couples dance from Spain, usually in triple metre, traditionally accompanied by guitars, castanets, or hand-clapping ("palmas" in Spanish). Fandango can both be sung and danced. Sung fandango is usually bipartite: it has an instrumental introduction followed by "variaciones".

image: manoamano.us
Flamenco
Flamenco

El baile flamenco is known for its emotional intensity, proud carriage, expressive use of the arms and rhythmic stamping of the feet (often confused [citation needed] with tap dance or Irish dance but with a completely different technique).

Jarabe Tapatío
Jarabe Tapatío

The "Jarabe Tapatío", better known internationally as the "Mexican hat dance", is a popular Mexican dance also popular in other countries such as Cuba, Peru, and the Dominican Republic, that has come to symbolize Latin America both domestically and internationally.

Jota
Jota

The jota (Spanish: ; Catalan: ; Aragonese: hota or ixota; Asturian: xota; Galician: xota; old Spanish spelling: xota) is a genre of music and the associated dance known throughout Spain, most likely originating in Aragon.

image: flickr.com
La Conquista
La Conquista

Baile Folklorico, or folk dancing, is a prominent part of Mexican culture today. These dances come in so many forms that it would be a challenge to elucidate them all. So instead, below are four interesting styles of Mexican folk dancing, their histories and meanings.

image: cocoro.tv
Los Voladores de Papantla
Los Voladores de Papantla

The Danza de los Voladores (Dance of the Flyers), or Palo Volador (flying pole), is an ancient Mesoamerican ceremony/ritual still performed today, albeit in modified form, in isolated pockets in Mexico.

Mambo
Mambo

The mambo dance that was invented by Perez Prado and was popular in the 1940s and 50s in Cuba, Mexico City, and New York is completely different from the modern dance that New Yorkers now call 'mambo' and which is also known as salsa "on 2".

Matlachines
Matlachines

The Matachines dance, with its curious cast of characters, is one of the very few dances performed both by the Pueblo and Hispanic people of New Mexico. One hundred years ago, almost every Hispanic or Pueblo village had its own Matachines group that would dance on the town’s annual feast day.

Merengue
Merengue

Merengue music found mainstream exposure in other areas of Latin America in the 1970s and 80s, with its peak in the 1990s. In the Southern Cone Argentina, Chile and Uruguay, merengue dance lost the characteristic of being danced close together, instead being danced separately while moving the arms.

MuiñEira
MuiñEira

Characteristics of the muiñeira. It is a dance of playful character, with a social component expressing gallantry. It is somewhat more permissive of improvisation than other folk dances; improvised in fiestas and exhibitions.

Paso Doble
Paso Doble

Pasodoble is a lively style of dance to the duple meter march-like music. Its original form as a Spanish military march is still interpreted in the context of the Moor and Christian festivals, in southeastern Spain, and is the major focus of current Pasodoble productions.

Rumba
Rumba

The first rumba competition took place in the Savoy Ballroom in 1930. Nowadays, two different styles of ballroom rumba coexist: American-style and International-style. During the 1940s and 1950s, the Mexican and American film industry expanded the use of the term rumba as rumbera films became popular.

Salsa
Salsa

Salsa dance socials are commonly held in night clubs, bars, ballrooms, restaurants, and outside, especially if part of an outdoor festival. Salsa dancing is an international dance that can be found in most metropolitan cities in the world.

Samba
Samba

Fiesta En La Calle’s outdoor celebration will feature a car and motorcycle show as well as folkloric Mexican ballet, Aztec dancing and samba and salsa hip-shakers. — benjy egel, sacbee, "Looking for a Cinco De Mayo fiesta?

Sardana
Sardana

The Sardana is a traditional Spanish dance which is danced in a circle while holding hands, and is native to the Spanish region of Catalonia. It originated in the historical region of Empordá, in the North-east of the Catalan region, but became popular across Catalonia during the 20th Century.

Sevillana
Sevillana

Whether watching a dance show on television or attending a social dance workshop, you're bound to run into some of these Latin styles. Related Articles. Latin Dance Steps; Latin Dance for Children; Names of Ballroom Dance Steps; Bachata. The Bachata is a dance from the Dominican Republic, named after Bachata guitar music.

Zambra
Zambra

The dance’s current form emerged nationally during the Mexican Revolution although various “jarabe” dances existed before this time, such as the Jarabe Jalisco, the Jarabe Atole and Jarabe Moreliana. The charros outfit is from Mexico’s cowboy tradition and the China Poblana outfit is based on the dress of an Asian woman who became famous in the city of Puebla in the colonial period. Today, this dress, especially the skirt, is heavily decorated with patriotic themes.