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Types of Microbats

Ardops​
Ardops​

Sometimes known as microbats, they are smaller than fruit-eating bats and are found worldwide except in the Arctic and Antarctic. Most microbats feed on flying insects, which they catch after dark. Other microbats, especially in the tropics, feed on bigger animals (such as frogs), nectar, or fruit.

source: dkfindout.com
Free-Tailed ​Bats​
Free-Tailed ​Bats​

Ventral view of a free-tailed microbat (Genus Tadarida) skull displaying a dilambdodont teeth pattern. Specimen from the Pacific Lutheran University Natural History collection. Frontal view of a free-tailed microbat (Genus Tadarida) skull displaying the canine teeth.

Harpiocephalus​
Harpiocephalus​

Microbats make a high-frequency noise from their mouth or nose as they fly; these noises strike objects and bounce back as echoes. The bat can then tell if the object is a tasty insect or a brick wall.

source: bats.org.au
Hipposideridae​
Hipposideridae​

MICROBAT Dictionary entry overview: What does microbat mean? • MICROBAT (noun) The noun MICROBAT has 1 sense: 1. typically having large ears and feeding primarily on insects; worldwide in distribution Familiarity information: MICROBAT used as a noun is very rare.

Horseshoe ​bat​
Horseshoe ​bat​

The horseshoe bats of Europe and California leaf-nosed bat have an incredibly intricate leaf-nose for echolocation and feed primarily on insects. Differences from megabats. Microbats use echolocation, whereas megabats do not typically.

image: mnn.com
Megadermatidae​
Megadermatidae​

To resolve the paraphyly of microbats, the Chiroptera were redivided into suborders Yangochiroptera (which includes Nycteridae, vespertilionoids, noctilionoids, and emballonuroids) and Yinpterochiroptera, which includes megabats, rhinopomatids, Rhinolophidae, and Megadermatidae.

Mormoopidae​
Mormoopidae​

Sometimes known as microbats, they are smaller than fruit-eating bats and are found worldwide except in the Arctic and Antarctic. Most microbats feed on flying insects, which they catch after dark. Other microbats, especially in the tropics, feed on bigger animals (such as frogs), nectar, or fruit.

source: dkfindout.com
Mosia​
Mosia​

Most microbats feed on flying insects, which they catch after dark. Other microbats, especially in the tropics, feed on bigger animals (such as frogs), nectar, or fruit. A few even drink blood. Microbats have poor eyesight but good hearing that allows them to sense insects flying by.

source: dkfindout.com
Mouse-Eared ​Bats​
Mouse-Eared ​Bats​

Microbats are 4 to 16 cm (1.6–6.3 in) long. Most microbats feed on insects, but some of the larger species hunt birds, lizards, frogs, smaller bats or even fish. Only three species of microbat feed on the blood of large mammals or birds ("vampire bats"); these bats live in South and Central America.

image: buzzle.com
New World ​Leaf-Nosed Bats​
New World ​Leaf-Nosed Bats​

They also consume other bats. Vampire bats are microbats that feed on the ... (leaf-nosed bats ... it was imported to New World Encyclopedia: History of "Microbat"

Noctilionoidea​
Noctilionoidea​

Frugivorous microbats also possess a different pattern on their molars compared to carnivorous, insectivorous, nectarivorous, and sanguinivorous microbats. In contrast, insectivorous microbats are characterized by having larger, but fewer teeth, long canines, and shortened third upper molars; while carnivorous microbats have large upper molars.

image: tolweb.org
Pipistrelles​
Pipistrelles​

Sometimes known as microbats, they are smaller than fruit-eating bats and are found worldwide except in the Arctic and Antarctic. Most microbats feed on flying insects, which they catch after dark. Other microbats, especially in the tropics, feed on bigger animals (such as frogs), nectar, or fruit.

source: dkfindout.com
Sac-Winged ​bat​
Sac-Winged ​bat​

The 51 species of sac-winged or sheath-tailed bats constitute the family Emballonuridae, and can be found in tropical and subtropical regions all over the world. Emballonurids include some of the smallest of all bats, and range from 3.5 to 10 cm in body length.

image: flickr.com
Vampire bat​
Vampire bat​

Microbats are 4 to 16 cm (1.6–6.3 in) long. Most microbats feed on insects, but some of the larger species hunt birds, lizards, frogs, smaller bats or even fish. Only three species of microbat feed on the blood of large mammals or birds ("vampire bats"); these bats live in South and Central America.

Vesper bat​
Vesper bat​

Vesper bats (family Vespertilionidae), also known as evening bats or common bats, are the largest and best-known family of bats. They belong to the suborder Microchiroptera . Over 300 species are distributed all over the world, on every continent except Antarctica.

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