A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Milk

Almond Milk
Almond Milk

Almond milk is made from ground almonds and filtered water. It may also contain starches and thickeners to improve its consistency and shelf life. People who are allergic to almonds or nuts should avoid almond milk. Almond milk is lower in calories than other milks, as long as it is unsweetened.

Buttermilk
Buttermilk

It takes 1 gallon of milk to yield 1/2 pint of true buttermilk. Commercially Made Buttermilk. Nowadays, most buttermilk is made by an industrial process that has little to do with making butter. First, a bacteria culture is added to pasteurized sweet whole milk or, more commonly, skim or non-fat milk. Flecks of butter may or may not be added as well.

Chocolate Milk
Chocolate Milk

Chocolate milk is sweetened chocolate-flavored milk. It can be made by mixing chocolate syrup (or chocolate powder) with milk (from cows, goats, soy, rice, etc.).

image: fanpop.com
For Calcium: Almond Milk
For Calcium: Almond Milk

Per cup, unsweetened almond milk has: about 30 to 60 calories; 1 gram of carbohydrates (sweetened varieties have more) 3 grams of fat; 1 gram of protein ; Even though almonds are a good source of protein, almond milk is not. Almond milk is also not a good source of calcium. However, many brands of almond milk are supplemented with calcium and vitamin D.

For Coffee: Hazelnut Milk
For Coffee: Hazelnut Milk

Hazelnut milk is the new "it" milk at specialty coffee shops. First there was non-dairy creamer, the original "coffee whitener.". It's the lactose-free powder that for decades was widely used as a "non-dairy" substitute for milk or cream but has rarely seen the inside of a cup of specialty "third wave" coffee.

source: latimes.com
For Cookies: Flax Milk
For Cookies: Flax Milk

A tastier option is "Lactation Cookies" which work great and taste amazing. ... and flax seed. ... 36 Responses to Lactation Cookies to Increase Milk Production.

For Homemade Soup: Coconut Milk
For Homemade Soup: Coconut Milk

I’ve been using coconut products for years, especially coconut oil. Coconut Milk is a wonderful alternative to pasteurized cow’s milk or to rice, soy or other processed milks. Unfortunately, the cans of most store bought versions of coconut milk are lined with BPA.

For Mashed Potatoes: Hemp Milk
For Mashed Potatoes: Hemp Milk

If you prefer a non-dairy substitute, opt for a plant-based milk like soy, rice, oat, hemp, or almond milk. Substitute these at a 1:1 ratio. Consider adding an extra 1 to 2 tablespoons of vegan butter for richer potatoes that more closely mimic the fat in milk.

source: leaf.tv
For Pancake mix: Oat Milk
For Pancake mix: Oat Milk

How to Replace the Milk in a Pancake. Pancake recipes usually call for milk. ... Can I Make Aunt Jemima Pancake Mix With Milk? Calories in Banana Pancakes.

For Salad Dressing: Cashew Milk
For Salad Dressing: Cashew Milk

a whole foods, oil free, GUILT FREE, Creamy Cashew Caesar Salad Dressing, ... to dairy and have been craving a Caesar salad but they all have milk ? Thanks so ...

For Smoothies: Soy Milk
For Smoothies: Soy Milk

The Best Soy Milk And Fruit Smoothie Recipes on Yummly | Banana, Honey And Soy Milk Smoothie, Soy Milk And Banana Exercise Recovery Smoothie, Strawberry-banana Soy Smoothie

source: yummly.com
Hemp Milk
Hemp Milk

Hemp food products -- like hemp seeds, hemp protein and hemp milk -- come from the Cannibus sativa plant, Jarosh and Clarke say. It's the same plant that marijuana comes from, but when you eat hemp, you're not getting the "drug" part of the plant, otherwise known as THC (tetrahydrocannabinol).

source: self.com
Low-Fat Chocolate Milk
Low-Fat Chocolate Milk

The primary types of milk sold in stores are: whole milk, reduced-fat milk (2%), low-fat milk (1%), and fat-free milk. The percentages included in the names of the milk indicate how much fat is in the milk by weight. Whole milk is 3.5% milk fat and is the closest to the way it comes from the cow before processing.

image: walmart.com
Low-Fat Goat Milk
Low-Fat Goat Milk

Meyenberg low fat goat milk is a great way to experience the rich, creamy taste of goat milk with only 100 calories per serving. Like our whole milk, it’s delicious over cereal, added to coffee, dunked with cookies or sipped from a tall glass.

source: meyenberg.com
image: walmart.com
Partly Skimmed Milks
Partly Skimmed Milks

Partly skimmed milks are the most popular types of milk for everyday use. You can use both 1% and 2% interchangeably in recipes calling for milk. Both are available in cartons, bags, bottles or jugs.

Raw or Unpasteurized Milk
Raw or Unpasteurized Milk

Raw milk is milk from cows, sheep, or goats that has not been pasteurized to kill harmful bacteria. This raw, unpasteurized milk can carry dangerous bacteria such as Salmonella, E. coli, and Listeria, which are responsible for causing numerous foodborne illnesses.

source: fda.gov
Rice Milk
Rice Milk

Rice milk is a dairy free milk made from rice. Like soy milk and almond milk, rice milk is safe for those who suffer from lactose intolerance. Rice milk is also low in fat, which makes it a good milk substitute for baking.

source: fitday.com
Skim Milk
Skim Milk

Skim Milk or Fat-Free Milk. Merriam-Webster defines skim milk as milk from which the cream has been removed. Technically, over 99.5 percent of the fat must be removed, making the product virtually fat-free. Also called skimmed milk, skim milk is the same product as fat-free milk.

Soy Milk
Soy Milk

Soy milk and almond milk are the top two most popular dairy milk alternatives. They are highly recommended breakfast drinks for people with casein allergies, lactose intolerance, diabetes or heart diseases. There is really no say in which of them is better for you.

source: fitday.com
image: wow85.tk
Types of Milk
Types of Milk

The primary types of milk sold in stores are: whole milk, reduced-fat milk (2%), low-fat milk (1%), and fat-free milk. The percentages included in the names of the milk indicate how much fat is in the milk by weight. Whole milk is 3.5% milk fat and is the closest to the way it comes from the cow before processing.

Whole Milk
Whole Milk

Milk producers take the cream out of the milk, then put some of it back in, depending on what label you want to stick on the carton. For skim milk, your dairy producer literally skims the cream off the top and leaves it out, whereas with 1% or 2% milk they're taking it out and adding some back in until it's 1% or 2% of the total volume.

source: thrillist.com