A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Minerals

Barbertonite (Polytype of Stichtite)
Barbertonite (Polytype of Stichtite)

- Indicates mineral may be doubtful at this locality. - Good crystals or important locality for species. - World class for species or very significant. (TL) - Type Locality for a valid mineral species. (FRL) - First Recorded Locality for everything else (

source: mindat.org
Bauxite (Aluminium ore)
Bauxite (Aluminium ore)

Bauxite is not a mineral. It is a rock formed from a laterite soil that has been severely leached of silica and other soluble materials in a wet tropical or subtropical climate. It is the primary ore of aluminum. Almost all of the aluminum that has ever been produced has been extracted from bauxite.

source: geology.com
Beckerite (Natural Resin)
Beckerite (Natural Resin)

List of minerals . Kids Encyclopedia ... Beckerite natural resin; Bertrandite; Beryl; Biotite (mineral group) ... Krantzite natural resin; Kunzite variety of ...

image: etsy.com
Bentonite (Mixture of Montmorillonite and Other Clays)
Bentonite (Mixture of Montmorillonite and Other Clays)

"The name montmorillonite is used currently both as a group name for all clay minerals with an expanding lattice, except vermiculite, and also as specific mineral name. Specifically it indicates a high-aluminia end member of the montmorillonite group with some slight replacement of Al3+ by Mg++ and substantially no replacement of Si4+ by Al3+.

Bixbite (red gem Variety of Beryl)
Bixbite (red gem Variety of Beryl)

Some of the red gems being marketed as red beryl or bixbite are actually pezzottaite, a new gemstone variety that was discovered in Madagascar. Pezzottaite is also very rare - but not yet as valuable as bixbite. It is a different mineral altogether, with a different chemical composition, density and refractive index.

source: gemselect.com
image: tumblr.com
Bowenite (Variety of Antigorite)
Bowenite (Variety of Antigorite)

An unnecessary name for an aluminium-bearing variety of Antigorite. ... Bowenite: Originally described ... Antigorite. in: Minerals first discovered in Switzerland ...

source: mindat.org
image: minerals.net
Brammallite (Variety of Illite)
Brammallite (Variety of Illite)

Illite Jade. A dense variety of illite with reddish banding (caused by microscopic inclusions of hematite), which is used for carving and as an ornamental stone. In addition to hematite, the material usually also contains small quantities of impurities such as quartz,...

source: mindat.org
image: mindat.org
Brokenhillite
Brokenhillite

Thought to be a new member of the pyrosmalite group, but this turned out to be erroneous. Originally reported from Broken Hill, Yancowinna Co., New South Wales, Australia.

source: mindat.org
Carbonates eg
Carbonates eg

Carbonate minerals are those minerals containing the carbonate ion, ... 05.EG With SO 4 or SiO 4: 05 Schrockingerite, 10 Lepersonnite-(Gd) Class: nitrates.

Halides eg
Halides eg

Two commercially important halide minerals are halite and fluorite. The former is a major source of sodium chloride, in parallel with sodium chloride extracted from sea water or brine wells.

Hydroxides eg Goethite, Brucite
Hydroxides eg Goethite, Brucite

Brucite may form as a standalone mineral, but it can also form as layers within minerals of the chlorite group and clay minerals such as Montmorillonite and Smectite. It forms a component of certain types of marbles, which are commercially known as pearl grey marble.

source: minerals.net
Native Elements eg Gold, Silver, Mercury, Graphite, Diamond
Native Elements eg Gold, Silver, Mercury, Graphite, Diamond

Minerals, being natural chemicals, are classified according to their chemistry and crystal form. A basic classification for minerals is: Native elements. eg. Gold, Silver, Mercury, graphite, diamond. Oxides. eg corundum (incl. sapphire), hematite, spinel. Hydroxides. eg. Goethite, brucite. Sulfides. eg. Pyrite, galena, sphalerite. Sulfates. eg.

source: quora.com
Oxides eg Corundum (Incl Sapphire), Hematite, Spinel
Oxides eg Corundum (Incl Sapphire), Hematite, Spinel

Oxides. eg corundum (incl. sapphire), hematite, spinel. Hydroxides. eg. Goethite, brucite. Sulfides. eg. Pyrite, galena, sphalerite. Sulfates. eg. Baryte, gypsum. Carbonates. eg. Calcite, magnesite, dolomite. Phosphates. eg. Apatite, monazite. Halides. eg. Fluorite, halite (rock salt). Silicates (most common) Orthosilicates. eg. Garnet, olivine.

source: quora.com
Phosphates eg
Phosphates eg

Phosphate minerals are those minerals that contain the tetrahedrally coordinated phosphate (PO43−) anion along with the freely substituting arsenate (AsO43−) and vanadate (VO43−). Chlorine (Cl−), fluorine (F−), and hydroxide (OH−) anions that also fit into the crystal structure.

Sulfates eg Baryte, Gypsum
Sulfates eg Baryte, Gypsum

Detailed description, properties, and locality information guide about the mineral gypsum (selenite).

source: minerals.net
Sulfides eg Pyrite, Galena, Sphalerite
Sulfides eg Pyrite, Galena, Sphalerite

Sphalerite can be found in many ore veins of sulfide minerals, commonly associated with galena and pyrite. Miners call sphalerite "jack," "blackjack," or "zinc blende.". Its impurities of gallium, indium and cadmium make sphalerite a major ore of those metals.

source: thoughtco.com
image: minfind.com