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Types of Modern art

Constructivism​
Constructivism​

Constructivism was the last and most influential modern art movement to flourish in Russia in the 20 th century. It evolved just as the Bolsheviks came to power in the October Revolution of 1917, and initially it acted as a lightning rod for the hopes and ideas of many of the most advanced Russian artists who supported the revolution's goals.

Cubism​
Cubism​

Cubism was a truly revolutionary style of modern art developed by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braques. It was the first style of abstract art which evolved at the beginning of the 20th century in response to a world that was changing with unprecedented speed.

image: etsy.com
De Stijl​
De Stijl​

Neo-Plasticism refers to the painting style and ideas developed by Piet Mondrian in 1917, promoted by De Stijl. Denoting the "new plastic art," or simply "new art," the term embodies Mondrian's vision of an ideal, abstract art form he felt was suited to the modern era.

image: zazzle.com
Fauvism​
Fauvism​

Fauvism is the style of les Fauves (French for "the wild beasts"), a group of early twentieth-century modern artists whose works emphasized painterly qualities and strong color over the representational or realistic values retained by Impressionism.

Futurism​
Futurism​

Unlike many other modern art movements, such as Impressionism and Pointillism, Futurism was not immediately identified with a distinctive style. Instead its adherents worked in an eclectic manner, borrowing from various aspects of Post-Impressionism, including Symbolism and Divisionism.

Post-​Impressionism​
Post-​Impressionism​

Van Gogh, Gauguin, Seurat, and Cézanne innovated Impressionism by infusing symbolism, optics, structure, and personal expression.

Suprematism​
Suprematism​

The term suprematism refers to an art based upon “the supremacy of pure artistic feeling” rather than on visual depiction of objects. Suprematism was an art movement, focused on basic geometric forms, such as circles, squares, lines, and rectangles, painted in a limited range of colors.

Vorticism​
Vorticism​

Vorticism was a short-lived modernist movement in British art and poetry of the early 20th century, partly inspired by Cubism. The movement was announced in 1914 in the first issue of BLAST, which contained its manifesto and the movement's rejection of landscape and nudes in favour of a geometric style tending towards abstraction.

image: tate.org.uk

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