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Types of Moles

Acquired
Acquired

Acquired moles are moles that appear during childhood and adulthood. Most of these moles are benign and pose no risk, although sometimes they can turn into cancerous moles with age. This is the most common type of mole, and it is usually caused by repeated sun exposure.

Atypical
Atypical

ATYPICAL MOLES are unusual-looking benign (noncancerous) moles, also known as dysplastic nevi (the plural of “nevus,” or mole). Atypical moles may resemble melanoma, and people who have them are at increased risk of developing melanoma in a mole or elsewhere on the body. The higher the number of these moles someone has, the higher the risk. Those who have 10 or more have 12 times the risk of developing melanoma compared with the general population.

Compound Nevi
Compound Nevi

ATYPICAL MOLES are unusual-looking benign (noncancerous) moles, also known as dysplastic nevi (the plural of “nevus,” or mole). Atypical moles may resemble melanoma, and people who have them are at increased risk of developing melanoma in a mole or elsewhere on the body.

Congenital
Congenital

A congenital nevus, also known as a mole, is a type of pigmented birthmark that appears at birth or during a baby’s first year. These occur in 1-2 percent of the population. These moles are frequently found on the trunk or limbs, although they can appear anywhere on the body.

source: chop.edu
Halo Nevi
Halo Nevi

A halo nevus is a mole surrounded by a white ring or halo. These moles are almost always benign, meaning they aren’t cancerous. Halo nevi (the plural of nevus) are sometimes called Sutton nevi or leukoderma acquisitum centrifugum.

Intradermal Nevi
Intradermal Nevi

Intradermal and Compound Naevi are a form of melanocytic naevus. Learn more about Intradermal and Compound Naevi.

source: patient.info
Junctional Melanocytic Nevi
Junctional Melanocytic Nevi

These are a form of melanocytic naevus (or mole) where the accumulation of melanocytes is located predominantly at the dermo-epidermal junction, hence their name. Junctional naevi are often quite darkly pigmented and are macular or very thinly papular with only minimal elevation above the level of the skin.

source: patient.info
image: bianoti.com

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