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Types of Mountain Dogs

Appenzeller Sennenhunde
Appenzeller Sennenhunde

Variously known as the Appenzeller Mountain Dog, Appenzell Mountain Dog, and Appenzeller Sennenhunde, this bold and athletic breed enjoys romping and roughhousing, especially in the snow! This rugged and intelligent breed likes to keep busy and needs to have something to do. He is not an apartment dog.

Bernese Mountain Dog
Bernese Mountain Dog

The Bernese Mountain Dog is prone to bloat, cancer and eyelid problems, hip and elbow dysplasia. Gains weight easily. Do not overfeed. Prone to mast cell tumors. Living Conditions. Bernese Mountain Dogs are not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large, fenced-in yard. Because of their thick coats they are sensitive to the heat and would much rather be in cold temperatures.

Entlebucher Mountain Dog
Entlebucher Mountain Dog

The Entlebucher Sennenhund or Entlebucher Mountain Dog is a medium-sized herding dog, it is the smallest of the four Sennenhunds, a dog type that includes four regional breeds. The name Sennenhund refers to people called Senn, herders in the Swiss Alps. Entlebuch is a region in the canton of Lucerne in Switzerland.

Great Pyrenees
Great Pyrenees

The dogs made their way to Europe; the Great Pyrenees remained in the high mountain regions until the Middle ages, when the breed gradually gained popularity with the French nobility as a guard dog. By the late 17th century, every French noble wanted to own one.

image: ar15.com
Leonberger
Leonberger

This mountain dog occurs with a generous double coat; the Leonberger is a large, muscular, and elegant dog with balanced body type, medium temperament, and dramatic presence. The head is adorned with a striking black mask and projects the breed's distinct expression of intelligence, pride, and kindliness.

Mountain Dog Breeds
Mountain Dog Breeds

Bernese Mountain Dog. Regarded by many as the most beautiful of the four breeds of Swiss Mountain Dogs, the Bernese is the only one with a long coat. Its ancestry traces to mastiff-type dogs of Roman times, which crossbred with local herding dogs to produce offspring smaller in stature but just as trustworthy and devoted.

Saint Bernard
Saint Bernard

Prior to 1830, all Saint Bernards were shorthaired; it took 2 years of uncommonly severe weather and a dwindling of the Saint breed to convince the monks to outcross the breed with longer-haired dogs, resulting in a long-haired variety.

source: akc.org
Tibetan Mastiff
Tibetan Mastiff

The Tibetan Mastiff is a large Tibetan dog breed. Originating with the nomadic cultures of Tibet, China, India, Mongolia and Nepal, it is used by local tribes of Tibetans to protect sheep from wolves, leopards, bears, large mustelids, and tigers.