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Types of Mycoses

Aspergillosis
Aspergillosis

Mycosis is a fungal infection of animals, including humans. Mycoses are common and a variety of environmental and physiological conditions can contribute to the development of fungal diseases. Inhalation of fungal spores or localized colonization of the skin may initiate persistent infections; therefore, mycoses often start in the lungs or on the skin.

Candidiasis
Candidiasis

Mycosis is a fungal infection of animals, including humans. Mycoses are common and a variety of environmental and physiological conditions can contribute to the development of fungal diseases. Inhalation of fungal spores or localized colonization of the skin may initiate persistent infections; therefore, mycoses often start in the lungs or on the skin.

Cryptococcosis
Cryptococcosis

Invasive Mycoses Cryptococcosis. Last Updated: August 17, 2016; Last Reviewed: June 14, 2017. Epidemiology. Most HIV-associated cryptococcal infections are caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, but occasionally Cryptococcus gattii is the etiology.

Hyalohyphomycosis
Hyalohyphomycosis

General description. The mycoses encompassed in the hyalohyphomycosis group are very heterogeneous, with only the presence in tissues of hyaline hyphae (without pigment in the wall) as a common characteristic.

Phaeohyphomycosis
Phaeohyphomycosis

Phaeohyphomycosis is an uncommon infection, however the number of case reported has been increasing in recent years. The presence of melanin in cell walls may be a virulence factor for the pathogens caused by the fungi.

image: quazoo.com
Zygomycosis
Zygomycosis

Mucormycosis (previously called zygomycosis) is a serious but rare fungal infection caused by a group of molds called mucormycetes. These molds live throughout the environment. Mucormycosis mainly affects people with weakened immune systems and can occur in nearly any part of the body.

source: cdc.gov