A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Narcolepsy

Cataplexy
Cataplexy

Cataplexy affects approximately 70% of people who have narcolepsy, and is caused by an autoimmune destruction of neurons that produce the neuropeptide hypocretin (also called orexin), which regulates arousal and wakefulness. Cataplexy without narcolepsy is rare and the cause is unknown.

Extreme Daytime Sleepiness
Extreme Daytime Sleepiness

Narcolepsy and Extreme Sleepiness. Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder that causes disabling daytime sleepiness and other symptoms. Narcolepsy is related to the dreaming period of sleep called REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. With narcolepsy, though, REM periods can occur throughout the day.

source: webmd.com
Hallucinations
Hallucinations

Hallucinations: Usually, these delusional experiences are vivid and frequently frightening. The content is primarily visual, but any of the other senses can be involved. These are called hypnagogic hallucinations when accompanying sleep onset and hypnopompic hallucinations when they occur during awakening.

source: webmd.com
Narcolepsy Type 1
Narcolepsy Type 1

Though narcolepsy is a rare condition, it occurs commonly enough, with type 1 affecting about one in 5,000 people. The diagnosis should be made by a sleep specialist who is able to apply the proper testing and subsequently provide effective treatment.

image: aasmnet.org
Narcolepsy Type 2
Narcolepsy Type 2

Narcolepsy is always characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, but there are other symptoms and test results that are used to differentiate the sub-types of the condition. There are two types of narcolepsy, but what is the difference between narcolepsy type 1 and type 2? Learn about these differences, including the role of cataplexy and testing for hypocretin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

image: medscape.org
Other Symptoms
Other Symptoms

What Are the Symptoms of Narcolepsy? Symptoms of narcolepsy include: Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS): In general, EDS interferes with normal activities on a daily basis, whether or not a person with narcolepsy has sufficient sleep at night.

source: webmd.com
Sleep Paralysis
Sleep Paralysis

People with narcolepsy can have vivid, dream-like hallucinations while falling asleep or as they are waking up. During these episodes, the visions feel real—for example, seeing a person in the bedroom.

Related Facts