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Types of Neoplasm

Acoustic Neuroma
Acoustic Neuroma

Acoustic Neuroma Causes. There are two types of acoustic neuroma: a sporadic form and a form associated with a syndrome called neurofibromatosis type II (NF2). NF2 is an inherited disorder characterized by the growth of noncancerous tumors in the nervous system. Acoustic neuromas are the most common of these tumors and often occur in both ears by age 30.

source: webmd.com
Acute Granulocytic Leukemia (see Leukemia)
Acute Granulocytic Leukemia (see Leukemia)

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has many other names, including acute myelocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute granulocytic leukemia, and acute non-lymphocytic leukemia. “Acute” means that this leukemia can progress quickly if not treated, and would probably be fatal in a few months.

source: cancer.org
Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) (see Leukemia)
Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) (see Leukemia)

Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, is a cancer that starts from the early version of white blood cells called lymphocytes in the bone marrow (the soft inner part of the bones, where new blood cells are made). Leukemia cells usually invade the blood fairly quickly.

source: cancer.org
Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) (see Leukemia)
Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) (see Leukemia)

Leukemias are cancers that start in cells that would normally develop into different types of blood cells. Here we will talk about acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has many other names, including acute myelocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute granulocytic leukemia, and acute non-lymphocytic leukemia.

source: cancer.org
Adenocarcinoma (see Lung Cancer)
Adenocarcinoma (see Lung Cancer)

The information here focuses on small cell lung cancer. See Lung Cancer (Non-Small Cell) for information about that type of lung cancer. Other types of lung cancer and tumors. Lung carcinoid tumors: Less than 5% of lung tumors are carcinoid tumors of the lung. Most of these grow slowly. For more information about these tumors, see Lung Carcinoid Tumor.

source: cancer.org
Adenosarcoma (see Lung Cancer)
Adenosarcoma (see Lung Cancer)

Adenosarcoma is a tumor that is a mixture of an adenoma (a tumor that starts in the gland-like cells of epithelial tissue) and a sarcoma (a tumor that starts in bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, blood vessels, or other connective or supportive tissue).

source: sharecare.com
Adrenocortical Carcinoma (see Adrenal Cancer)
Adrenocortical Carcinoma (see Adrenal Cancer)

The type of cancer that develops in the cortex of the adrenal gland is called adrenal cortical carcinoma or just adrenal cancer. This rare type of cancer is also known as adrenocortical cancer (or carcinoma).

source: cancer.org
Astrocytoma
Astrocytoma

Astrocytoma is the most common a type of glioma tumor that can develop in the brain and spinal cord. It’s more common in men than women and most often shows up after age 45. There are several types of astrocytoma, and some grow faster than others.

source: webmd.com
Chordoma
Chordoma

Chordoma is a rare slow-growing neoplasm thought to arise from cellular remnants of the notochord. The evidence for this is the location of the tumors (along the neuraxis), the similar immunohistochemical staining patterns, and the demonstration that notochordal cells are preferentially left behind in the clivus and sacrococcygeal regions when the remainder of the notochord regresses during fetal life.

CNS Lymphoma
CNS Lymphoma

Because primary CNS lymphoma spreads throughout the brain, external radiation therapy is given to the whole brain. This is called whole brain radiation therapy. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer.

source: cancer.gov
Craniopharyngioma
Craniopharyngioma

Craniopharyngioma is a rare, usually suprasellar neoplasm, which may be cystic, that develops from nests of epithelium derived from Rathke's pouch. Rathke's pouch is an embryonic precursor of the anterior pituitary. Craniopharyngiomas are typically very slow growing tumors.

image: flickr.com
Grade I – Pilocytic Astrocytoma
Grade I – Pilocytic Astrocytoma

Overview of astrocytomas. Grade I: Pilocytic astrocytoma; Grade II: Diffuse astrocytoma / Low-grade astrocytoma; Grade III: Anaplastic astrocytoma ; Grade IV: Glioblastomas (also called glioblastoma multiforme, GBM, or grade IV astrocytoma). Anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastomas are malignant astrocytomas that grow and spread aggressively, accounting for more than 50 percent of all astrocytomas. Glioblastomas occur most often in adults between the ages of 50 and 70.

Grade II – Low-Grade Astrocytoma
Grade II – Low-Grade Astrocytoma

They are considered low-grade (grade II), but they can develop into higher-grade tumors. Pineal astrocytic tumors can be any grade. They form around the pineal gland. This tiny organ in the cerebrum makes melatonin, which helps control sleep and waking. Brain stem gliomas are rare in adults.

source: webmd.com
Grade III – Anaplastic Astrocytoma
Grade III – Anaplastic Astrocytoma

Anaplastic astrocytoma is a rare malignant brain tumor. Astrocytomas are tumors that develop from certain star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes. Astrocytes and similar cells form tissue that surrounds and protects other nerve cells found within the brain and spinal cord.

Grade IV – Glioblastoma (GBM)
Grade IV – Glioblastoma (GBM)

Glioblastoma, sometimes called glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is considered a grade 4 brain tumor and is aggressive. See some of the most common questions asked about the disease. See some of the most common questions asked about the disease.

Malignant Neoplasms are Commonly Called Cancer
Malignant Neoplasms are Commonly Called Cancer

Malignant tumor or malignant neoplasm. A cancerous tumor, or abnormal growth of cells. Neoplasms, or the cells that make up malignant tumors, invade nearby healthy tissue and may metastasize (spread) to other areas of the body. A malignant tumor is the opposite of a benign (noncancerous) tumor.

Medulloblastoma
Medulloblastoma

Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. It originates in the back part of the brain called the cerebellum. In up to 1/3 of cases, it can spread to other parts of the brain and spinal cord.

Meningioma
Meningioma

A meningioma is a tumor that forms on membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord just inside the skull. Specifically, the tumor forms on the three layers of membranes that are called meninges. These tumors are often slow-growing. As many as 90% are benign (not cancerous). Most meningiomas occur in the brain.

source: webmd.com
Other Gliomas: Brain Stem Glioma Ependymoma
Other Gliomas: Brain Stem Glioma Ependymoma

About 33 percent of all brain tumors are gliomas, which originate in the glial cells that surround and support neurons in the brain, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and ependymal cells. Gliomas are called intra-axial brain tumors because they grow within the substance of the brain and often mix with normal brain tissue.

Potentially-Malignant Neoplasms Include Carcinoma in Situ
Potentially-Malignant Neoplasms Include Carcinoma in Situ

Carcinoma in situ (CIS), also known as ... Exceptions include CIS of the colon (polyps), ... Thus, the pneumonic form of BAC is a true malignant entity, ...