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Types of Nerve Blocks

Bleeding
Bleeding

Nerve blocks can be used, in some cases, to avoid surgery. Types of Nerve Blocks Various areas of pain require different nerve block types. Below are a few of the available nerve blocks and some parts of the body where they are used.

source: webmd.com
Death (in Rare Cases)
Death (in Rare Cases)

Side Effects and Risks of Nerve Blocks. Nerve blocks do have risks and side effects. They include: Elevated blood sugars; Rash; Itching; Weight gain; Extra energy; Soreness at the site of injection; Bleeding; Death (in rare cases) Although many kinds of nerve blocks exist, this treatment cannot always be used.

source: webmd.com
Elevated Blood Sugars
Elevated Blood Sugars

The injection of this nerve-numbing substance is called a "regional nerve blockade" or simply "nerve block". Nerve blocks are achieved by combining a local anesthetic (such as lidocaine) with epinephrine, a steroid (corticosteroid), and/or opioids.

Extra Energy
Extra Energy

Nerve blocks are used for pain treatment and management. Often a group of nerves, called a plexus or ganglion, that causes pain to a specific organ or body region can be blocked with the injection of medication into a specific area of the body. The injection of this nerve-numbing substance is called ...

source: webmd.com
Itching
Itching

A nerve block is the injection of numbing medication (local anesthetic) near specific nerves to decrease your pain in a certain part of your body during and after surgery. For specific types of surgery, your anesthesiologist may place a “nerve catheter,” which may be used to continuously bathe the nerves in numbing medication for 2-3 days after the surgery.

Maxillary Nerve Block (Upper jaw)
Maxillary Nerve Block (Upper jaw)

Learn more from WebMD about the use of nerve blocks in pain management. ... Maxillary nerve block (upper jaw) Sphenopalatine nerve block (nose and palate)

source: webmd.com
Ophthalmic Nerve Block (Eyelids and Scalp)
Ophthalmic Nerve Block (Eyelids and Scalp)

Sympathetic nerve block: A sympathetic nerve block is one that is performed to determine if there is damage to the sympathetic nerve chain. This is a network of nerves extending the length of the spine.

source: webmd.com
Rash
Rash

Stellate ganglion block: This is a type of sympathetic nerve block performed to determine if there is damage to the sympathetic nerve chain supplying the head, neck, chest, or arms and if it is the source of pain in those areas.

source: webmd.com
Soreness at the Site of Injection
Soreness at the Site of Injection

Preemptive nerve blocks are meant to prevent subsequent pain from a procedure that can cause problems including phantom limb pain. Nerve blocks can be used, in some cases, to avoid surgery. Types of Nerve Blocks. Various areas of pain require different nerve block types. Below are a few of the available nerve blocks and some parts of the body where they are used.

source: webmd.com
Sphenopalatine Nerve Block (Nose and Palate)
Sphenopalatine Nerve Block (Nose and Palate)

Learn more from WebMD about the use of nerve blocks in pain management. ... Sphenopalatine nerve block (nose and palate) Cervical epidural, thoracic epidural, ...

source: webmd.com
Supraorbital Nerve Block (Forehead)
Supraorbital Nerve Block (Forehead)

The supraorbital nerve runs through the bones of the face at the eyebrow, providing sensation to the forehead and the top of the head. The nerve exits the skull just above the eyes. What Is a Supraorbital Nerve Block for Migraine? It is thought that blocking the supraorbital nerve lessens pain in the front of the head by shutting down the pain receptors in the nerve. The nerve block may also work by preventing the nerve from carrying pain information to the central nervous system.

Trigeminal Nerve Blocks (Face)
Trigeminal Nerve Blocks (Face)

What is a trigeminal nerve block? A trigeminal nerve block is an injection of medication that helps relieve facial pain. It’s used to treat: Trigeminal neuralgia; Herpes zoster infection (or “shingles”) affecting the face; Other atypical facial pain syndromes; Trigeminal nerves are responsible for sensations in your face and for helping you bite, chew and swallow.

Weight Gain
Weight Gain

Re: Nerve Blocks and Weight Gain?? Thanks for the replies! I had gained weight & got massive moon face from my epidurals last year & it took about 1/2 year for all of it to come off oh sooo slowwwwly.

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