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Types of Orioles

Altamira ​Oriole​
Altamira ​Oriole​

The Altamira oriole (Icterus gularis) is a New World oriole. The bird is widespread in subtropical lowlands of the Mexican Gulf Coast and northern Central America, the Pacific coast and inland. They have since spread to southern Texas, but this was not until 1939. At 25 cm (9.8 in) and 56 g (2.0 oz), this is the largest oriole in genus Icterus.

image: ebirdr.com
Audubon's ​Oriole​
Audubon's ​Oriole​

Members of a pair may stay together all year, and often forage together in the woods, but they can be hard to see; slow-moving, quiet, and rather secretive, they often stay low in dense cover. Audubon's Orioles may be noticed first by their hesitant slow whistles from deep in the thickets.

source: audubon.org
Baltimore ​Oriole​
Baltimore ​Oriole​

The official website of the Baltimore Orioles with the most up-to-date information on scores, schedule, stats, tickets, and team news. The official website of the Baltimore Orioles with the most up-to-date information on scores, schedule, stats, tickets, and team news.

source: mlb.com
image: audubon.org
Bar-Winged ​Oriole​
Bar-Winged ​Oriole​

The bar-winged oriole (Icterus maculialatus) is a species of bird in the family Icteridae. It is found in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and heavily degraded former forest.

Black-Backed ​Oriole​
Black-Backed ​Oriole​

In the nonbreeding season, Black-backed Orioles often forages in small flocks, which also may include Bullock's Oriole (Icterus bullockii). Indeed, there is a low level of hybridization between Black-backed and Bullock's orioles where their breeding ranges abut in northern Durango.

Black-Cowled ​Oriole​
Black-Cowled ​Oriole​

The black-cowled oriole (Icterus prosthemelas) is a species of bird in the family Icteridae. It is found in the eastern half of mainland Central America. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.

Black-Vented ​Oriole​
Black-Vented ​Oriole​

Black-vented Oriole Icterus wagleri In Mexico and Central America, this large oriole lives mostly in dry forest or semi-open woods of the foothills and lower mountain slopes. It has wandered north into Texas and Arizona on only a few occasions, but some of these strays have remained for months.

source: audubon.org
Bullock's ​Oriole​
Bullock's ​Oriole​

The Bullock's oriole is a small New World blackbird. At one time, this species and the Baltimore oriole were considered to be a single species, the northern oriole. This bird was named after William Bullock, an English amateur naturalist.

Campo ​Troupial​
Campo ​Troupial​

The campo oriole or campo troupial (Icterus jamacaii) is a species of bird in the family Icteridae that is found in northeastern Brazil. At one time thought to be identical to the Venezuelan troupial, it is now accepted as a separate species.

Epaulet Oriole​
Epaulet Oriole​

The epaulet oriole (Icterus cayanensis) is a species of bird in the family Icteridae. The moriche oriole, formerly considered a distinct species (I. chrysocephalus) is now placed herein as a subspecies. The variable oriole, (I. pyrrhopterus), was formerly considered conspecific, but has recently been split by the SACC.

image: flickr.com
Hispaniolan ​Oriole​
Hispaniolan ​Oriole​

The Hispaniolan oriole's breeding season lasts March through June. The clutch usually contains 3-4 eggs that are white or pale blue with red-brown spots. The Shiny cowbird (Molothrus bonariensis) is a brood parasite of the oriole.

image: oiseaux.net
Hooded Oriole​
Hooded Oriole​

Hooded Orioles are fairly large songbirds with longer and more delicate bodies than other orioles. They also have long rounded tails and longish necks. The bill is curved slightly downward, more so than in most other orioles.

Jamaican ​Oriole​
Jamaican ​Oriole​

The Jamaican oriole (Icterus leucopteryx) is found chiefly on the island of Jamaica. On the island of San Andrès extant subspecies of the bird can be found. The species is considered extinct on the island of Grand Cayman. Subspecies are restricted geographically to their island homes.

Martinique ​Oriole​
Martinique ​Oriole​

The Martinique oriole (Icterus bonana) is a species of bird in the family Icteridae. It is endemic to Martinique, French West Indies. Martinique is a part of the lesser Antilles, and is located in the Eastern Caribbean.

image: arkive.org
Montserrat ​Oriole​
Montserrat ​Oriole​

The Montserrat oriole (Icterus oberi) is a medium-sized black-and-yellow icterid (the same family as many blackbirds, meadowlarks, cowbirds, grackles, and others, including the New World orioles). It inhabits the Centre Hills and South Soufriere Hills Important Bird Areas on the island of Montserrat in the Lesser Antilles of the West Indies, and is the national bird of this British territory.

Orange Oriole​
Orange Oriole​

Wondering how to attract Orioles to your yard? Baltimore and orchard orioles are widespread in the East, and the Bullock’s is found throughout the West. The Scott’s and hooded orioles are common in the Southwest, but you can see the other four orioles only at the extreme southern edge of Texas or Florida.

Orange-​Backed Troupial​
Orange-​Backed Troupial​

The Venezuelan troupial (Icterus icterus) is the national bird of Venezuela and one of about 25 or so species of New World orioles. It is found in Colombia, Venezuela, and the Caribbean islands of Aruba, Curaçao, Bonaire, and Puerto Rico.

Orange-​Crowned Oriole​
Orange-​Crowned Oriole​

The orange-crowned oriole (Icterus auricapillus) is a species of bird in the family Icteridae. It is found in eastern Panama, Colombia and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, and heavily degraded former forest.

Orchard Oriole​
Orchard Oriole​

Orchard Orioles are slim songbirds, larger than warblers and vireos. They have medium-length tails, rounded heads, and a straight, sharply pointed bill. They have medium-length tails, rounded heads, and a straight, sharply pointed bill.

image: audubon.org
Saint Lucia ​Oriole​
Saint Lucia ​Oriole​

St. Lucia orioles are endemic to, and exclusively found on the main island of St. Lucia. They are the only resident orioles on the island, however, Baltimore and Orchard orioles may be found in the region as vagrants.

image: arkive.org
Scott's Oriole​
Scott's Oriole​

The rich, melodious whistles of the Scott's Oriole carry well across the slopes of the western foothills and valleys where it spends the summer. This bird occupies a variety of southwestern habitats, from dense oak woods of the lower canyons to open grassland with scattered yuccas, often placing its nest in a yucca and using the long fibers of this plant in nest construction. Scott's Orioles tend to be uncommon, and unlike some orioles, they are seldom seen in flocks.

source: audubon.org
Spot-Breasted ​Oriole​
Spot-Breasted ​Oriole​

Native to southwestern Mexico and Central America and sometimes kept as a cagebird, this large oriole apparently escaped from captivity in the Miami area in the late 1940s. The suburbs of southern Florida, with their gardens of exotic plants, provided a suitable habitat for some tropical birds, so the Spot-breasted Oriole thrived there. Its numbers have been hurt occasionally by exceptionally cold winters, but it is currently doing well in some areas between Miami and West Palm Beach.

source: audubon.org
image: birdspix.com
Streak-​Backed Oriole​
Streak-​Backed Oriole​

The streak-backed oriole (Icterus pustulatus) is a medium-sized species of passerine bird from the icterid family (the same family as many blackbirds, meadowlarks, cowbirds, grackles, and others, including the New World orioles).

image: audubon.org
Venezuelan ​Troupial​
Venezuelan ​Troupial​

The Northern Troupials or Venezuelan Troupials (Icterus icterus) are large members of the "New World Oriole" family that mostly occur in northern and central South America. However, some subspecies are found in the northern and eastern extremes of the South American continent.

White-Edged ​Oriole​
White-Edged ​Oriole​

The White-edged Oriole is endemic to the Tumbesian region of southwestern Ecuador and northwest ... White-edged Orioles probably breed principally in the wet ...

Yellow Oriole​
Yellow Oriole​

Yellow-backed orioles are a yellow-bodied, sexually monomorphic species. They average 21.5 cm (8.5 in) in length from beak to tail; making it a relatively medium-sized oriole species. Exposed skin and claws are bluish-black; in adults, the bill is black, with the base of the mandible becoming bluish-grey.

Yellow-​Backed Oriole​
Yellow-​Backed Oriole​

Yellow-backed orioles are a yellow-bodied, sexually monomorphic species. They average 21.5 cm (8.5 in) in length from beak to tail; making it a relatively medium-sized oriole species. Exposed skin and claws are bluish-black; in adults, the bill is black, with the base of the mandible becoming bluish-grey.

Yellow-Tailed ​Oriole​
Yellow-Tailed ​Oriole​

The yellow-tailed oriole (Icterus mesomelas) is a passerine bird in the New World family Icteridae. It breeds from southern Mexico to western Peru and northwestern Venezuela; in Peru it also lives in a river valley corridor.

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