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Types of Ovum

Hard Boiled
Hard Boiled

Hard-boiled eggs are cooked so that the egg white and egg yolk both solidify, while for a soft-boiled egg the yolk, and sometimes the white, remain at least partially liquid. A few different methods are used to make boiled eggs other than simply immersing them in boiling water.

Hard Scrambled
Hard Scrambled

Any tips to make hard scrambled eggs without the 2 tbsps pool of liquid that always ends up in the bottom of my pan? Details on my technique if helpful: whisk eggs, add to pan preheated on low-very medium, let them settle for 45 seconds to 1 minute, stir the cooked eggs to top, and repeat until just done, then toss with cheese and remove.

source: chowhound.com
Over Easy
Over Easy

Over easy or over light Edit. Cooked on both sides; ... A fried egg served over white rice, topped with a dab of oyster or hoisin sauce, is also …

Over Hard
Over Hard

In a nonstick skillet set over medium-low heat, melt 2 teaspoons butter …

source: safeeggs.com
Over Medium
Over Medium

Over easy: The egg is flipped and cooked for just a few seconds longer, enough to fully set the whites but leave the yolk completely runny. Watch our how to cook an over easy egg video below. Over medium: This time, the flipped egg cooks for a minute or two, long enough to partly set the yolk but still leave it a little creamy (yet not thin and runny).

image: ehow.com
Soft Boiled
Soft Boiled

Timing the Perfect Soft-Boiled Egg. A good soft-boiled egg really comes down to timing. Bring the water up to a boil, then lower it to a rapid simmer. Add the eggs to the pot, and then begin timing.

source: thekitchn.com
Soft Scrambled
Soft Scrambled

Author Notes: First, a confession: I used to hate scrambled eggs. They reminded me of sulfur-infused cardboard. Or insulation. Years later, I learned how to make creamy, soft scrambled eggs, and now I crave them regularly.

source: food52.com
Sunny Side Up
Sunny Side Up

What Are Sunny-Side-Up Eggs? An egg cooked "sunny-side up" means that it is fried just on one side and never flipped. The yolk is still completely liquid and the whites on the surface are barely set. You can cover the pan briefly to make sure the whites are cooked or baste them with butter.

source: thekitchn.com

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