A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Paresis

Bell's Palsy, Partial Facial Paralysis
Bell's Palsy, Partial Facial Paralysis

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bell’s palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis. Every year, around 40,000 Americans experience sudden facial paralysis due to Bell’s palsy. This condition causes inflammation of the facial nerve, which commonly causes the muscles on one side of the face to droop.

Bulbar Palsy, Impairment of Cranial Nerves
Bulbar Palsy, Impairment of Cranial Nerves

In contrast, pseudobulbar palsy is a clinical syndrome similar to bulbar palsy but in which the damage is located in upper motor neurons of the corticobulbar tracts in the mid-pons (i.e., in the cranial nerves IX-XII), that is the nerve cells coming down from the cerebral cortex innervating the motor nuclei in the medulla.

Paraplegia, Which Affects Both of Your Legs
Paraplegia, Which Affects Both of Your Legs

Neurologists use the term paresis to describe weakness, and plegia to describe paralysis in which all voluntary movement is lost. The term paresis comes from the Ancient Greek: πάρεσις "letting go" from παρίημι "to let go, to let fall".