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Types of Parkinson's

Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD)
Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD)

Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD) Types of Parkinson's and Parkinsonism Parkinsonism is the umbrella term given to a group of conditions that feature Parkinson’s-type symptoms: tremor of muscles and slowness of movement (bradykinesia).

source: epda.eu.com
Dementia With Lewy Bodies (DLB)
Dementia With Lewy Bodies (DLB)

Lewy bodies at the base of the brain are closely linked to problems with movement (motor symptoms). These are the main feature of Parkinson's disease. Lewy bodies in the outer layers of the brain are linked to problems with mental abilities (cognitive symptoms), which is a feature of DLB. People with a Lewy body disorder can have problems with movement and changes in mental abilities at the same time.

Drug-Induced Parkinsonism
Drug-Induced Parkinsonism

The form of Parkinsonism that develops after being treated with particular medications is known as drug-induced Parkinsonism. It is the one of the most common causes of Parkinsonism after Parkinson’s disease.

Essential Tremor
Essential Tremor

Essential tremor doesn't cause other health problems, but Parkinson's disease is associated with stooped posture, slow movement and shuffling gait. However, people with essential tremor sometimes develop other neurological signs and symptoms, such as an unsteady gait (ataxia).

Impaired Posture and Balance
Impaired Posture and Balance

Impaired Posture and Balance As a person with Parkinson’s disease loses some of the reflexes and coordination required to maintain an upright posture, they may become stooped or slouched over. This doesn’t happen overnight, however.

Loss of Automatic Movements
Loss of Automatic Movements

Loss of automatic movements. In Parkinson’s disease, you may have a decreased ability to perform unconscious movements, including blinking, smiling or swinging your arms when you walk. You may no longer gesture when talking. Speech changes. You may have speech problems as a result of Parkinson’s disease.

source: mdadvice.com
image: gncdubai.com
Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)
Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)

MSA-P and Parkinson’s Disease Symptom-wise, both multiple system atrophy and Parkinson’s disease cause slowness of movement with rigid posture, tremor and unstable, shuffling gait. However, MSA may be distinguished from Parkinson’s disease in certain notable ways.

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP)
Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP)

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is an uncommon brain disorder that affects movement, control of walking (gait) and balance, speech, swallowing, vision, mood and behavior, and thinking. The disease results from damage to nerve cells in the brain.

source: ninds.nih.gov
Rating Scales
Rating Scales

Similar rating scales Other rating scales for Parkinson's disease are the Hoehn and Yahr scale and Schwab and England activities of daily living scale, although both of these measures are currently included within the UPDRS in modified format.

image: yumpu.com
Slowed Movement (Bradykinesia)
Slowed Movement (Bradykinesia)

Bradykinesia, which means slow movement, is one of the characteristic motor symptoms of PD. Bradykinesia is noticeable as the gradual loss and slowing down of spontaneous movement, which may appear as a decrease in facial expressions and a chronic, abnormal stillness.

Speech Changes
Speech Changes

Learn about the causes of speech problems in Parkinson's disease, and find out what treatments can help. Learn about the causes of speech problems in Parkinson's disease, and find out what treatments can help.

Stage Five
Stage Five

Parkinson’s disease is typically divided into five stages. Learn more about each stage and associated symptoms. The main symptoms of Parkinson’s disease include uncontrollable shaking and tremors, slowed movement (bradykinesia), and stiffness in your limbs.

Stage One
Stage One

If you have Parkinson’s disease (PD), you may wonder how your condition will unfold. You might want to know what symptoms you might have, when they’ll start, and how they’ll affect your life. These are basic questions.

source: webmd.com
Stage Three
Stage Three

If you have Parkinson’s disease (PD), you may wonder how your condition will unfold. You might want to know what symptoms you might have, when they’ll start, and how they’ll affect your life. These are basic questions.

source: webmd.com
Stage Two
Stage Two

If you have Parkinson’s disease (PD), you may wonder how your condition will unfold. You might want to know what symptoms you might have, when they’ll start, and how they’ll affect your life. These are basic questions.

source: webmd.com
Theory of PD Progression: Braak's Hypothesis
Theory of PD Progression: Braak's Hypothesis

Theory of PD Progression: Braak’s Hypothesis The current theory (part of the so-called Braak's hypothesis) is that the earliest signs of Parkinson's are found in the enteric nervous system, the medulla and the olfactory bulb, which controls sense of smell.

source: parkinson.org
Tremor
Tremor

A tremor is an involuntary quivering movement affecting 80% of people with Parkinson’s. What is a tremor? A tremor is an involuntary quivering movement or shake. Characteristically occurring at rest, the classic slow, rhythmic tremor of Parkinson’s disease typically starts in one hand, foot, or leg and can eventually affect both sides of the body.

Vascular (Arteriosclerotic) Parkinsonism
Vascular (Arteriosclerotic) Parkinsonism

Vascular (Arteriosclerotic) parkinsonism can be difficult to distinguish from Parkinson’s. However, stroke symptoms tend to appear suddenly and do not progress, whereas the symptoms of Parkinson’s appear gradually and get worse over time. Vascular parkinsonism usually affects the legs more than the upper part of the body.

source: epda.eu.com
Writing Changes
Writing Changes

Many people with Parkinson's disease notice changes in their handwriting. This handwriting change is called micrographia. Here we will discuss ways of making writing easier and adapting.

source: parkinson.org