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Types of Parkinson's Disease

Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD)
Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD)

Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a rare type of Parkinsonism that affects people from the age of 40, typically between the ages of 50 to 70. It tends to affect one side of the body more than the other initially, gradually spreading over the course of a few years.

source: epda.eu.com
Dementia With Lewy Bodies (DLB)
Dementia With Lewy Bodies (DLB)

About dementia with Lewy bodies Most experts estimate that dementia with Lewy bodies is the third most common cause of dementia after Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, accounting for 10 to 25 percent of cases.

source: alz.org
Drug-Induced Parkinsonism
Drug-Induced Parkinsonism

Drug-induced Parkinsonism usually presents itself symmetrically. Freezing, which is more common in Parkinson’s disease, is a rare occurrence in drug-induced Parkinsonism. Incidence of rest tremor is more evident in drug-induced Parkinsonism than in Parkinson’s disease. Studies have also known that drug-induced Parkinsonism is more common in females, whereas Parkinson’s disease is more common in males.

Essential Tremor
Essential Tremor

Essential tremor doesn't cause other health problems, but Parkinson's disease is associated with stooped posture, slow movement and shuffling gait. However, people with essential tremor sometimes develop other neurological signs and symptoms, such as an unsteady gait (ataxia).

Impaired Posture and Balance
Impaired Posture and Balance

Impaired Posture and Balance As a person with Parkinson’s disease loses some of the reflexes and coordination required to maintain an upright posture, they may become stooped or slouched over. This doesn’t happen overnight, however.

Loss of Automatic Movements
Loss of Automatic Movements

Loss of automatic movements. In Parkinson’s disease, you may have a decreased ability to perform unconscious movements, including blinking, smiling or swinging your arms when you walk. You may no longer gesture when talking.

source: mdadvice.com
image: gncdubai.com
Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)
Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)

Symptom-wise, both multiple system atrophy and Parkinson’s disease cause slowness of movement with rigid posture, tremor and unstable, shuffling gait. However, MSA may be distinguished from Parkinson’s disease in certain notable ways.

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP)
Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP)

Progressive supranuclear palsy, or PSP, is a rare neurodegenerative disease that is often misdiagnosed as Parkinson's disease because its symptoms are similar. Because of its rarity, PSP is mostly unknown by the general public.

source: webmd.com
Rating Scales
Rating Scales

The unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) is used to follow the longitudinal course of Parkinson's disease. The UPD rating scale is the most commonly used scale in the clinical study of Parkinson's disease.

image: yumpu.com
Rigid Muscles
Rigid Muscles

Rigidity also can occur in the hips and ankles, and in the neck and trunk (rigidity in your neck and trunk is called "axial rigidity"). Unlike some neurological conditions which affect muscle tone, the rigidity in Parkinson's disease affects flexor and extensor muscles equally.

Slowed Movement (Bradykinesia)
Slowed Movement (Bradykinesia)

Bradykinesia, which means slow movement, is one of the characteristic motor symptoms of PD. Bradykinesia is noticeable as the gradual loss and slowing down of spontaneous movement, which may appear as a decrease in facial expressions and a chronic, abnormal stillness.

Speech Changes
Speech Changes

Both can be helped by seeing a speech pathologist or speech therapist. In particular, the Lee Silverman Voice Therapy Program, has demonstrated significant value for people with Parkinson's. Ask your doctor about a referral to a speech pathologist experienced in administering the Lee Silverman Voice Therapy program.

source: webmd.com
Stage Five
Stage Five

Parkinson’s disease is typically divided into five stages. Learn more about each stage and associated symptoms. The main symptoms of Parkinson’s disease include uncontrollable shaking and tremors, slowed movement (bradykinesia), and stiffness in your limbs.

Stage One
Stage One

Parkinson’s disease doesn’t move in a straight line, ... But any stage can have lots of gray areas. ... Almost everyone with Parkinson’s gets at least one of these.

source: webmd.com
Stage Two
Stage Two

Parkinson’s disease doesn’t move in a straight line, so it can be hard to know what’s coming next. Learn why it’s so hard to predict and how its symptoms may change over time.

source: webmd.com
Theory of PD Progression: Braak's Hypothesis
Theory of PD Progression: Braak's Hypothesis

Parkinson’s disease ... Watch this video for more information about the forms and stages of Parkinson’s. ... Theory of PD Progression: Braak’s Hypothesis.

source: parkinson.org
Tremor
Tremor

Parkinson’s is a progressive disorder, which means your symptoms get more serious over time. It can affect your movements as well as things like your vision, sleep, and mental health. A person with Parkinson’s can get different symptoms at different times than someone else with the same condition.

source: webmd.com
Vascular (Arteriosclerotic) Parkinsonism
Vascular (Arteriosclerotic) Parkinsonism

Vascular (Arteriosclerotic) parkinsonism can be difficult to distinguish from Parkinson’s. However, stroke symptoms tend to appear suddenly and do not progress, whereas the symptoms of Parkinson’s appear gradually and get worse over time. Vascular parkinsonism usually affects the legs more than the upper part of the body.

source: epda.eu.com
Writing Changes
Writing Changes

Many people with Parkinson's disease notice changes in their handwriting. This handwriting change is called micrographia. Here we will discuss ways of making writing easier and adapting.

source: parkinson.org