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Types of peg Tubes

Gastric or Gastrostomy (G) Tubes
Gastric or Gastrostomy (G) Tubes

These are one-piece tubes held in place either by a retention balloon or by a bumper. They are often used as the initial G-tube for the first 8-12 weeks post-surgery. PEG specifically describes a long G-tube placed by endoscopy, and stands for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. Sometimes the term PEG is used to describe all G-tubes.

image: medscape.com
Gastrojejunal (GJ) or Transjejunal Tubes
Gastrojejunal (GJ) or Transjejunal Tubes

GJ-tubes are placed in the stomach just like G-tubes, but a thin, long tube is threaded into the jejunal (J) portion of the small intestine. The vast majority of children who get GJ feeding tubes begin with G-tubes; it is rare for a GJ-tube to be placed initially.

Gastrostomy Feeding
Gastrostomy Feeding

Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) feeding tubes were first described in 1980 for use in children . PEG feeding tubes are now increasingly used for enteral nutrition for children and adults. PEG may be used with a jejunal extension .

source: patient.info
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Gastrostomy With Jejunal Adapter
Gastrostomy With Jejunal Adapter

Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement is indicated in patients requiring medium to long term enteral feeding and with impaired swallowing. PEG-pull method is the most widely used PEG technique.

image: bardpv.com
Jejunal (J) Tubes
Jejunal (J) Tubes

PEG-J Gastrostomy drainage/ jejunal feeding tubes are combined tubes with outer 24-28 Fr gastric drainage lumens and inner small long feeding tubes that go through the stomach into the jejunum (second part of small intestine).

Jejunostomy Feeding
Jejunostomy Feeding

First described in 1837, surgical gastrostomy was the mainstay of direct enteral feeding access for decades. Although laparoscopic techniques for gastrostomy and jejunostomy tube access have evolved since then, their use is limited because of the acceptance of less invasive endoscopic and radiologic alternatives.

image: dxline.info
Nasoduodenal (ND) Tubes
Nasoduodenal (ND) Tubes

The choice between nasogastric (NG), nasoduodenal (ND), and nasojejunal (NJ) tubes depends on whether your child can tolerate feeding into the stomach or not. NG-tubes NG-tubes enter the body through the nose and run down the esophagus into the stomach.

Nasoenteric Feeding Tubes (NG & NJ)
Nasoenteric Feeding Tubes (NG & NJ)

Nasogastric and nasoenteric tubes are flexible double or single lumen tubes that are passed proximally from the nose distally into the stomach or small bowel. Enteric tubes that will be removed within a short period of time can also be passed through the mouth (orogastric). This topic will review the indications, contraindications, placement, management, and complications of nasogastric and nasoenteric tubes.

source: uptodate.com
image: pinnt.com
Nasogastric (NG) Tubes
Nasogastric (NG) Tubes

In nasogastric (NG) intubation, a thin tube is placed through your nose into your stomach. Learn why this procedure is used and what it involves. In nasogastric (NG) intubation, a thin tube is placed through your nose into your stomach.

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