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Types of Pepper Plants

Aleppo ​Pepper​
Aleppo ​Pepper​

Your best bet: A sweet paprika and cayenne pepper mix (with an optional pinch of salt) Aleppo pepper is known for its earthiness with hints of raisin and tomato, so using solely cayenne pepper would leave your recipe with too much heat and tasting slightly flat.

Anaheim ​Pepper​
Anaheim ​Pepper​

Anaheim Hot Pepper is rated 4.6 out of 5 by 8. Rated 4 out of 5 by SushinePatioGardener from Abundant Mildly Hot Chile Peppers Anaheims and Chili De Arbols are the only spicy chili peppers that I grow at my age now.

Banana ​Pepper​
Banana ​Pepper​

Plant spacing: 18 to 24 inches; Named for its banana-like shape, this variety bears sweet, mild banana peppers that mature from yellow, to orange, and then to crimson red. Plants fruit prolifically, easily producing up to 25 to 30 pods per plant.

Bell Pepper​
Bell Pepper​

The longer bell peppers stay on the plant, the more sweet they become and the greater their Vitamin C content. Use a sharp knife or scissors to cut peppers clean off the plant for the least damage. Peppers can be refrigerated in plastic bags for up to 10 days after harvesting.

source: almanac.com
Bird's eye Chili​
Bird's eye Chili​

The Bird’s Eye Pepper is a type of chili pepper that originated in Guyana. It has a slightly small and round shape, maturing to about a fourth of an inch wide and an inch long.

Capsicum ​Annuum var Glabriusculum​
Capsicum ​Annuum var Glabriusculum​

Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum is a variety of Capsicum annuum that is native to southern North America and northern South America. Common names include chiltepin, Indian pepper, chiltepe, and chile tepin, as well as turkey, bird’s eye, or simply bird peppers, due to their consumption and spread by wild birds.

Cascabel Chili​
Cascabel Chili​

Buy 500 varieties of Pepper Plants, Pepper Seeds and Fresh Peppers. 180 types of Tomato Plants and Tomato Seeds. Available mail-order or pickup in NJ.

Cayenne ​Pepper​
Cayenne ​Pepper​

Cayenne pepper plants are also known as guinea spice, cow horn peppers, aleva or bird peppers, but are more commonly referred to as red pepper in its powdered form and used to flavor food in a variety of cuisines and medicinally.

Chile de áRbol​
Chile de áRbol​

Plant size: 36 to 48 inches tall Scoville heat units: 15,000 to 30,000 (medium) Chili de Arbol blends fiery heat with smoky flavors that really enhance Mexican cooking. Tall plants (up to 4 feet) bear heavy loads of slender, curved peppers all summer long. This heirloom pepper hails from Chihuahua, Mexico, and is the pepper seen most often in dried pepper strings (ristras) or wreaths because fruits retain their bright red color after drying.

Cubanelle​
Cubanelle​

The thin-walled pepper is especially suited for quick cooking. Popular in dishes of Spanish, Italian, and Slavic descent, many cooks prefer it to bell types. In the garden, Cubanelle peppers are unique, often growing in imperfect shapes and changing color from green/yellow to shades of orange to red.

Friggitello​
Friggitello​

Try planting pepper plants near tomatoes, parsley, basil, and carrots in your home vegetable garden. Don't plant them near fennel or kohlrabi. Peppers are very colorful when in full fruit and combine well with green herbs, okra, beans and cucumber fences in the garden bed.

source: burpee.com
Guajillo Chili​
Guajillo Chili​

Guajillo normally grows to a max height of 1.49 feet (45.72 cm metric). Mexico is believed to be where Guajillo originates from. Being a fairly low maintenance plant, Guajillo Chili pepper is normally quite easy to grow provided a minimum level of care is given throughout the year.

source: myfolia.com
Jalapeño​
Jalapeño​

The jalapeno pepper plant is a member of the hot pepper family and shares company with other fiery hot varieties such as tobacco, cayenne and cherry. Jalapenos are the only pepper that isn’t allowed to fully ripen and change color before being picked.

Mulato ​Pepper​
Mulato ​Pepper​

If you pair an ancho and a mulato pepper next to each other, it may be tough to tell the difference. Beyond the mulato chili’s darker color it, shares a similar look. And for good reason. The mulato pepper is closely related to the ancho, coming from a poblano pepper variety with a slightly ...

image: snipview.com
Pequin ​Pepper​
Pequin ​Pepper​

Compost Tea Foliar Spray - If your pequin pepper plants have attracted the attention of aphids, use a compost tea spay to deter them. Spray the plants thoroughly (both upper & undersides of leaves), so that the plant is completely covered with compost tea.

source: dengarden.com
Peter Pepper​
Peter Pepper​

The peter pepper, Capsicum annuum var. annuum, is an heirloom chili pepper that is best known for its unusual shape. It is a type of Capsicum annuum, though it is not officially recognized as a cultivar of the species. It occurs in red and yellow varieties. The pepper is considered very rare, and its origin is unknown.

Poblano​
Poblano​

Plant spacing: 36 to 48 inches apart; Plant size: 36 to 60 inches tall and 36 to 48 inches wide; Scoville heat units: 1,000 to 2,000 (mild) Mexico’s favorite chile pepper! When traditionally ripened to red and dried, this pepper is known as an ‘Ancho’; it is also used green, as a ‘Poblano’, for making chiles rellenos.

Romanian ​Pepper​
Romanian ​Pepper​

(78 days) Favorite sweet heirloom variety from Romania. Strong, upright plant produces high yields of smooth, 4” long by 2” wide, tapered, pointed fruits. Peppers turn from pale yellow to orange, then red when mature. Great in stir fry, added to favorite dishes, fresh in salads, or stuffed.

Serrano ​Pepper​
Serrano ​Pepper​

Serrano Hot Pepper is rated 4.9 out of 5 by 11. Rated 5 out of 5 by tarcr from Growing Serranos in Costa Rica This is our favourite pepper for Mexican cooking. You can not find it in Costa Rica so we planted it from seed.