A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Periods

Early ​Cretaceous​
Early ​Cretaceous​

The Early Cretaceous/Middle Cretaceous (geochronological name) or the Lower Cretaceous (chronostratigraphic name), is the earlier or lower of the two major divisions of the Cretaceous. It is usually considered to stretch from 146 Ma to 100 Ma.

Eocene​
Eocene​

The Eocene ( / ˈ iː ə ˌ s iː n, ˈ iː oʊ-/) Epoch, lasting from , is a major division of the geologic timescale and the second epoch of the Paleogene Period in the Cenozoic Era. The Eocene spans the time from the end of the Paleocene Epoch to the beginning of the Oligocene Epoch.

Late Jurassic​
Late Jurassic​

The Jurassic period is divided into three epochs: Early, Middle, and Late. Similarly, in stratigraphy, the Jurassic is divided into the Lower Jurassic, Middle Jurassic, and Upper Jurassic series of rock formations.

Late Triassic​
Late Triassic​

The Late Triassic is the third and final of three epochs of the Triassic Period in the geologic timescale. The Triassic-Jurassic extinction event began during this epoch and is one of the five major mass extinction events of the Earth. The corresponding series is known as the Upper Triassic.

Mesozoic​
Mesozoic​

The Mesozoic was a time of significant tectonic, climate and evolutionary activity. The era witnessed the gradual rifting of the supercontinent Pangaea into separate landmasses that would move into their current positions during the next era. The climate of the Mesozoic was varied, alternating between warming and cooling periods.

Messinian​
Messinian​

The Messinian is in the geologic timescale the last age or uppermost stage of the Miocene. It spans the time between 7.246 ± 0.005 Ma and 5.333 ± 0.005 Ma (million years ago). It follows the Tortonian and is followed by the Zanclean, the first age of the Pliocene.

Mississippian​
Mississippian​

Mississippian Period in Georgia Etowah Indian Figures In Georgia the Mississippian Period is divided into Early, Middle, and Late subperiods. The Early Mississippian subperiod (A.D. 800-1100) was the time when the first chiefdoms developed in the state.

image: siue.edu
Nectarian​
Nectarian​

Pre-Nectarian - Nectarian - Early Imbrian - Late Imbrian - Eratosthenian - Copernican The lunar geological timescale (or selenological timescale) divides the history of Earth's Moon into five generally recognized periods: the Copernican, Eratosthenian, Imbrian (Late and Early epochs), Nectarian, and Pre-Nectarian.

Neoproterozoic​
Neoproterozoic​

The Neoproterozoic Era is the unit of geologic time from . It is the last era of the Precambrian Supereon and the Proterozoic Eon; it is subdivided into the Tonian, Cryogenian, and Ediacaran Periods. It is preceded by the Mesoproterozoic era and succeeded by the Paleozoic era.

Paleoarchean​
Paleoarchean​

The Paleoarchean (/ ˌ p eɪ l i oʊ ɑːr ˈ k iː ə n /), also spelled Palaeoarchaean (formerly known as early Archean), is a geologic era within the Archaean Eon. It spans the period of time —the era is defined chronometrically and is not referenced to a specific level of a rock section on Earth.

Paleoproterozoic​
Paleoproterozoic​

Paleoproterozoic Era ( / p æ l i oʊ ˌ p r oʊ t ər ə ˈ z oʊ ɪ k-/;), spanning the time period from (2.5–1.6 Ga), is the first of the three sub-divisions of the Proterozoic Eon. It was during this era that the continents first stabilized.

Pennsylvanian​
Pennsylvanian​

Pennsylvanian Period is a period that began 355 million years ago and lasted for about 64 million years. It was first characterized by the appearance of reptiles and widespread swampy forests. Well developed tree rings, less diverse flora and fauna were also common at the time.

Phanerozoic​
Phanerozoic​

The Phanerozoic Eon is the current geologic eon in the geologic time scale, and the one during which abundant animal and plant life has existed. It covers 541 million years to the present, and began with the Cambrian Period when diverse hard-shelled animals first appeared.

image: socratic.org
Pliocene​
Pliocene​

The Pliocene ( / ˈ p l aɪ ə ˌ s iː n /; also Pleiocene) Epoch is the epoch in the geologic timescale that extends from 5.333 million to 2.58 million years BP. It is the second and youngest epoch of the Neogene Period in the Cenozoic Era. The Pliocene follows the Miocene Epoch and is followed by the Pleistocene Epoch.

Proterozoic​
Proterozoic​

The Proterozoic Eon was a very tectonically active period in the Earth’s history. The late Archean Eon to Early Proterozoic Eon corresponds to a period of increasing crustal recycling, suggesting subduction.

Quaternary​
Quaternary​

Climate change and the developments it spurs carry the narrative of the Quaternary, the most recent 2.6 million years of Earth's history. Glaciers advance from the Poles and then retreat, carving and molding the land with each pulse. Sea levels fall and rise with each period of freezing and thawing.

Tertiary​
Tertiary​

Tertiary Period: Tertiary Period, interval of geologic time lasting from approximately 66 million to 2.6 million years ago. It is the traditional name for the first of two periods in the Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago to the present); the second is the Quaternary Period (2.6 million years ago to the present).

Ypresian​
Ypresian​

In the geologic timescale the Ypresian is the oldest age or lowest stratigraphic stage of the Eocene. It spans the time between 56 and 47.8 Ma, is preceded by the Thanetian age and is followed by the Eocene Lutetian age. The Ypresian is consistent with the lower Eocene.

image: 1stdibs.com

Related Types