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Types of Plate Movement

Continental-Continental Convergence
Continental-Continental Convergence

The supercontinent Pangea began to break up 200 Ma and India started a northward drift towards Asia. 80 Ma India was 6,400 km south of the Asian continent but moving towards it at a rate of between 9 and 16 cm per year.

Convergent Boundaries
Convergent Boundaries

Most movement occurs along narrow zones between plates where the results of plate-tectonic forces are most evident. There are four types of plate boundaries: Divergent boundaries -- where new crust is generated as the plates pull away from each other. Convergent boundaries -- where crust is destroyed as one plate dives under another.

source: pubs.usgs.gov
Divergent Boundaries
Divergent Boundaries

In plate tectonics, a divergent boundary or divergent plate boundary (also known as a constructive boundary or an extensional boundary) is a linear feature that exists between two tectonic plates that are moving away from each other.

Oceanic-Continental Convergence
Oceanic-Continental Convergence

Oceanic-oceanic convergence. As with oceanic-continental convergence, when two oceanic plates converge, one is usually subducted under the other, and in the process a trench is formed. The Marianas Trench (paralleling the Mariana Islands), for example, marks where the fast-moving Pacific Plate converges against the slower moving Philippine Plate.

source: pubs.usgs.gov
Oceanic-Oceanic Convergence
Oceanic-Oceanic Convergence

Oceanic-oceanic convergence. As with oceanic-continental convergence, when two oceanic plates converge, one is usually subducted under the other, and in the process a trench is formed. The Marianas Trench (paralleling the Mariana Islands), for example, marks where the fast-moving Pacific Plate converges against the slower moving Philippine Plate.

source: pubs.usgs.gov
Transform Boundaries
Transform Boundaries

The fracture zone that forms a transform plate boundary is known as a transform fault. Most transform faults are found in the ocean basin and connect offsets in the mid-ocean ridges. A smaller number connect mid-ocean ridges and subduction zones.

source: geology.com

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