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Types of Poetry Forms

Elegy​
Elegy​

Elegy: Poetic Form - The elegy is a poetic form that began as an ancient Greek metrical form and is traditionally written in response to the death of a person or group. The elements of a traditional elegy mirror three stages of loss.

source: poets.org
Epic Poetry​
Epic Poetry​

Epic: Poetic Form - An epic is a long, often book-length, narrative in verse form that retells the heroic journey of a single person, or group of persons. Elements that typically distinguish epics include superhuman deeds, fabulous adventures, highly stylized language, and a blending of lyrical and dramatic traditions.

source: poets.org
Free Verse​
Free Verse​

Free verse is a literary device that can be defined as poetry that is free from limitations of regular meter or rhythm, and does not rhyme with fixed forms. Such poems are without rhythm and rhyme schemes, do not follow regular rhyme scheme rules, yet still provide artistic expression.

Haiku​
Haiku​

Haiku: Poetic Form - A traditional Japanese haiku is a three-line poem with seventeen syllables, written in a 5/7/5 syllable count. Often focusing on images from nature, haiku emphasizes simplicity, intensity, and directness of expression.

source: poets.org
Limerick​
Limerick​

Though the origin of the limerick is not entirely known, it has an active, if not long, history. Limericks published in eighteenth-century Mother Goose’s Melodies are thought to be among the oldest. Poets quickly adopted the form and published limericks widely.

source: poets.org
Pastoral​
Pastoral​

Another sub-genre of pastoral poetry is the pastoral elegy, in which a poet, in the form of a shepherd, mourns the death of a friend. The most famous pastoral elegy is John Milton's Lycidas, written on the death of Edward King, a respected colleague at Cambridge University.

source: poets.org
Sonnet​
Sonnet​

Two sonnet forms provide the models from which all other sonnets are formed: the Petrarchan and the Shakespearean. Petrarchan Sonnet. Traditionally, the sonnet is a fourteen-line poem written in iambic pentameter, which employ one of several rhyme schemes and adhere to a tightly structured thematic organization.

source: poets.org
Terza Rima​
Terza Rima​

Later, the English Romantic poets experimented with the form, including Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, whose "Ode to the West Wind" is an example of what is sometimes called "terza rima sonnet," in which the final stanza comes in couplet form.

source: poets.org