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Types of Precautions

Epiglottitis, (Caused by Haemophilus Influenza Type b)
Epiglottitis, (Caused by Haemophilus Influenza Type b)

Haemophilus influenzae type b Polysaccharide-Protein Conjugate Vaccines. Conjugation is the process of chemically bonding a polysaccharide (a somewhat ineffective antigen) to a protein “carrier,” which is a more effective antigen.

source: cdc.gov
Flu (Contact and Droplet)
Flu (Contact and Droplet)

Infection Control in Health Care Facilities ... To receive weekly email updates about Seasonal Flu, ... Droplet Precautions Excerpt from the Isolation Guideline;

source: cdc.gov
Hand Hygiene
Hand Hygiene

Hand hygiene refers to both washing with plain or anti-bacterial soap and water and to the use of alcohol gel to decontaminate hands. When hands are not visibly soiled, alcohol gel is the preferred method of hand hygiene when providing health care to clients.

Meningococcal Disease: Sepsis, Pneumonia, Meningitis
Meningococcal Disease: Sepsis, Pneumonia, Meningitis

Index page leading to information about meningococcal such as symptoms, how meningococcal is caused, ways to prevent meningococcal, and how meningococcal is spread.

source: cdc.gov
Mumps (Infectious Parotitis)
Mumps (Infectious Parotitis)

Mumps is a viral illness caused by a paramyxovirus, a member of the Rubulavirus family. The average incubation period for mumps is 16 to 18 days, with a range of 12 to 25 days. Clinical Features. Mumps usually involves pain, tenderness, and swelling in one or both parotid salivary glands (cheek and jaw area).

source: cdc.gov
Mycoplasma Pneumonia
Mycoplasma Pneumonia

Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an 'atypical' bacterium that causes lung infection. It is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia and is sometimes referred to as 'walking pneumonia.' It is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia and is sometimes referred to as 'walking pneumonia.'

source: cdc.gov
Parvovirus B19 (Erythema Infectiosum or 5th Disease)
Parvovirus B19 (Erythema Infectiosum or 5th Disease)

A person usually gets sick with fifth disease within four to 14 days after getting infected with parvovirus B19. This disease, also called erythema infectiosum, got its name because it was fifth in a list of historical classifications of common skin rash illnesses in children.

source: cdc.gov
Pharyngeal Diphtheria
Pharyngeal Diphtheria

Use standard precautions with additional respiratory precautions for respiratory tract diphtheria, and standard precautions with additional contact precautions for cutaneous diphtheria, until the case is shown to be clear of carriage via two negative cultures taken at least 24 hours apart, collected at least 24 hours after completing antibiotics. The disease is usually not highly contagious after 48 hours of antibiotic therapy.

image: qdnurses.com
Pneumonia
Pneumonia

This one also trips me up... i've gotten infection control questions that tell me Haemophilus influenza pneumonia and streptococcal pneumonia are standard precautions, but my Saunders book says that

source: allnurses.com
Respiratory Hygiene/Cough Etiquette
Respiratory Hygiene/Cough Etiquette

Advise healthcare personnel to observe Droplet Precautions (i.e., wearing a surgical or procedure mask for close contact), in addition to Standard Precautions, when examining a patient with symptoms of a respiratory infection, particularly if fever is present.

source: cdc.gov
Safe Handling
Safe Handling

Safe steps in food handling, cooking, and storage are essential to prevent foodborne illness. You can't see, smell, or taste harmful bacteria that may cause illness. In every step of food preparation, follow the four steps of the Food Safe Families campaign to keep food safe: Clean — Wash hands and surfaces often.

source: fsis.usda.gov
Safe Injection Practices
Safe Injection Practices

Safe Injection Practices to Prevent Transmission of Infections to Patients Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Download the complete 2007 Guideline for Isolation Precautions: Preventing Transmission of Infectious Agents in Healthcare Settings [PDF – 3.80 MB]

source: cdc.gov
Use of Personal Protective Equipment (e
Use of Personal Protective Equipment (e

• Personal protective equipment PPE Use in Healthcare Settings The protection of healthcare personnel from infectious disease exposures in the workplace requires a combination of controls, one of which is the use of PPE. It is important to recognize that your protection as a healthcare worker also involves other prevention strategies.

source: cdc.gov

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