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Types of Preposition

Back to Word Classes (or Parts of Speech)
Back to Word Classes (or Parts of Speech)

Word Classes and Parts of Speech ... preposition , conjunction ... is.g.Word Classes and Parts of Speech 3.’ the word class that includes most words for ...

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Conjunctions
Conjunctions

What is the difference between Prepositions and Conjunctions? Prepositions highlight the place, position, etc. of two nouns. Conjunctions connect nouns, phrases

Demonstrative Pronouns (eg, This, These)
Demonstrative Pronouns (eg, This, These)

Do not confuse demonstrative adjectives with demonstrative pronouns. The words are identical, but demonstrative adjectives qualify nouns, whereas demonstrative pronouns stand alone. Demonstrative pronouns can be used in place of a noun, so long as the noun being replaced can be understood from the pronoun’s context.

Ending Sentences With Prepositions
Ending Sentences With Prepositions

There's some misinformation out there around ending sentences with prepositions. When is it okay and when isn't it? Grammar Girl explains.

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Indefinite Pronouns (eg, None, Several)
Indefinite Pronouns (eg, None, Several)

An indefinite pronoun does not refer to any specific person, thing or amount. It is vague and "not definite". Some typical indefinite pronouns are: all, another, any, anybody/anyone, anything, each, everybody/everyone, everything, few, many, nobody, none, one, several, some, somebody/someone.

Interrogative Pronouns (eg, Which, who)
Interrogative Pronouns (eg, Which, who)

In some cases, interrogative pronouns take on the suffix –ever. A few can also take on the old-fashioned suffix –soever, which is rarely seen in writing these days. For example: Whatever; Whatsoever; Whichever; Whoever; Whosoever; Whomever; Whomsoever; Whosever; Interrogative pronouns are very easy to remember and use. Memorize them to make things even simpler.

Personal Pronouns (eg, he, They)
Personal Pronouns (eg, he, They)

A pronoun can act as a subject, direct object, indirect object, object of the preposition, and more. Without pronouns, we’d have to keep on repeating nouns, and that would make our speech and writing repetitive, not to mention cumbersome.

Possessive Pronouns (eg, his, Your)
Possessive Pronouns (eg, his, Your)

Examples of Possessive Pronouns By YourDictionary A pronoun is a word that replaces a noun in a sentence, making the subject a person or a thing. Possessive pronouns are pronouns that demonstrate ownerships.

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Pronouns
Pronouns

A preposition will sit before a word (a noun or a pronoun) to show that word's relationship to another nearby word. Prepositions A preposition is a word (often a short word) that expresses the relationship between two other nearby words.

Reciprocal Pronouns (eg, Each Other, one Another)
Reciprocal Pronouns (eg, Each Other, one Another)

Each other; One another; Reciprocal pronouns are easy to use. When you want to refer to two people, you will normally use “each other.” When referring to more than two people, for example the students in a lecture hall, you will normally use “one another.” Examples of Reciprocal Pronouns. Reciprocal pronouns help prevent repetition within sentences.

Related Facts

Related Types