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Types of Psychotic Disorders

Agitation
Agitation

Psychosis is a serious mental disorder characterized by a loss of contact with reality. People who are psychotic may experience hallucinations or delusions. For example, they may see something, like a person, who isn’t actually there. We’ll explore the symptoms, causes, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment.

Anxiety
Anxiety

Anxiety Psychosis: What it is and How to Control it Anxiety can often make you feel like you're going crazy. For some people, the issue may be so extreme that they believe it falls under the heading of "psychosis" which many people take to mean that they have actually gone crazy.

Bipolar Disorder Symptoms
Bipolar Disorder Symptoms

People with bipolar disorder may experience hallucinations or delusions. When this occurs, the person is said to have bipolar disorder with psychotic features (with additional specifiers for bipolar I, bipolar II, current phase depressed, manic, or “mixed” presentation).

image: medscape.org
Brief Psychotic Disorder
Brief Psychotic Disorder

Brief psychotic disorder with obvious stressor (also called brief reactive psychosis): This type happens shortly after a trauma or major stress, such as the death of a loved one, an accident, assault, or a natural disaster.

source: webmd.com
Constipation
Constipation

Psychotic disorders are severe mental disorders that cause abnormal thinking and perceptions. People with psychoses lose touch with reality. Two of the main symptoms are delusions and hallucinations.

source: treato.com
Delusions or Hallucinations
Delusions or Hallucinations

Delusions and hallucinations are two very different symptoms that are both often experienced by people with psychosis. Delusions and hallucinations seem real to the person who is experiencing them. Delusions. A delusion is a false belief or impression that is firmly held even though it’s contradicted by reality and what is commonly considered true.

Depression Symptoms
Depression Symptoms

Psychotic depression is a subtype of major depression that occurs when a severe depressive illness includes some form of psychosis. The psychosis could be hallucinations (such as hearing a voice telling you that you are no good or worthless), delusions (such as, intense feelings of worthlessness, failure, or having committed a sin) or some other break with reality.

source: webmd.com
Disorganized Schizophrenia
Disorganized Schizophrenia

Disorganized schizophrenia is a former subtype of schizophrenia, a chronic mental illness. Disorganized schizophrenia, or hebephrenia, refers to incoherent and illogical thoughts and behaviors related to schizophrenia. However, hebephrenia is no longer considered a distinct form of schizophrenia.

Hypochondria
Hypochondria

Hypochondriasis or hypochondria is a condition in which a person is excessively and unduly worried about having a serious illness. An old concept, its meaning has repeatedly changed due to redefinitions in its source metaphors.

Insomnia
Insomnia

Insomnia and psychotic disorders go hand-in-hand. Insomnia can lead to psychotic disorders and vice-versa. Do not consider your lack-of-sleep a trivial issue – chronic insomnia puts you at an increased risk to depression, various other psychotic disorders, and heart diseases.

image: medscape.org
Intellectual Impairment
Intellectual Impairment

life for individuals with intellectual/developmental ... Disorders (DSM IV-TR): IQ score ... Substance-Induced Psychotic Disorder

Paranoid Schizophrenia
Paranoid Schizophrenia

Paranoid schizophrenia represents the most common of the many sub-types of the debilitating mental illness known collectively as schizophrenia. People with all types of schizophrenia become lost in psychosis of varying intensity, causing them to lose touch with reality. Untreated, people with ...

Paraphrenia
Paraphrenia

UpToDate: "Overview of Psychosis." MedLinePlus: "Psychotic Disorders." National Alliance of Mental Illness: "About the First Episodes of Psychosis." Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc.

source: webmd.com
Physical Immobility
Physical Immobility

Delusional disorder, previously called paranoid disorder, is a type of serious mental illness called a “psychosis” in which a person cannot tell what is real from what is imagined. · Organic or drug-induced psychosis.

Psychotic Disorder Due to a Medical Condition
Psychotic Disorder Due to a Medical Condition

Other medical disorders that may cause psychosis include CNS tumors and infections, stroke, migraine, and various endocrine disorders. The diagnosis is not used if patients have a psychologically mediated response to medical illness (eg, ICU psychosis), psychosis due to the effects of drugs or drug withdrawal, or delirium caused by a medical condition.

Residual Schizophrenia
Residual Schizophrenia

Just as the symptoms of schizophrenia are diverse, so are its ramifications. Different kinds of impairment affect each patient's life to varying degrees. Some people require custodial care in state institutions, while others are gainfully employed and can maintain an active family life.

Schizoaffective Disorder
Schizoaffective Disorder

Schizoaffective disorder describes a condition that includes aspects of both schizophrenia and a mood disorder (either major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder). Scientists are not entirely certain whether schizoaffective disorder is a condition related mainly to schizophrenia or a mood disorder.

source: webmd.com
Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia

Schizoaffective disorder: People have symptoms of both schizophrenia and a mood disorder, such as depression or bipolar disorder. Schizophreniform disorder: This includes symptoms of schizophrenia, but the symptoms last for a shorter time: between 1 and 6 months.

source: webmd.com
Schizophreniform Disorder
Schizophreniform Disorder

Schizophreniform disorder is a type of psychotic illness with symptoms similar to those of schizophrenia, but lasting for less than 6 months. Like schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder is a type of "psychosis" in which a person cannot tell what is real from what is imagined.

source: webmd.com
Substance-Induced Psychotic Disorder
Substance-Induced Psychotic Disorder

A Substance-Induced Psychotic Disorder is distinguished from a primary Psychotic Disorder by considering the onset, course, and other factors. For drugs of abuse, there must be evidence from the history, physical examination, or laboratory findings of Dependence, Abuse, intoxication, or withdrawal.

source: health.am
Undifferentiated Schizophrenia
Undifferentiated Schizophrenia

Undifferentiated schizophrenia is characterized by general symptoms of schizophrenia that do not fit a specific classification or diagnosis of another subtype. People may exhibit the traditional 'positive' and 'negative' symptoms, but they may fluctuate over a period of time.