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Types of ra

Fatigue
Fatigue

The chronic fatigue of RA may not be as clear-cut as pain and swelling, but it can have a big effect on your physical and mental wellbeing. To fight fatigue, a team approach is best. That may include your rheumatologist, a physical therapist, an occupational therapist, and a mental health specialist.

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Fever
Fever

In addition to joint pain and fatigue, fever is a symptom of rheumatoid arthritis. Inflammation is often the reason people living with RA experience low-grade fevers. When fever is related to an autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, treating the autoimmune disease will improve fever ...

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Joint Pain
Joint Pain

Managing the pain that comes with rheumatoid arthritis is about more than taking medications. Learn more from the experts at WebMD.

source: webmd.com
Joint Stiffness
Joint Stiffness

There are different kinds of drugs that treat rheumatoid arthritis. You may need to take more than one. Some stop the disease from getting worse. Others ease symptoms of joint stiffness and pain. Physical therapy and exercise. These will help you move better and with less pain.

source: webmd.com
Minor Joint Swelling
Minor Joint Swelling

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder that causes chronic inflammation of joints. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) tends to begin slowly with minor symptoms that come and go, usually on both sides of the body, and progress over a period of weeks or months.

Morning Stiffness
Morning Stiffness

If it’s RA, joint stiffness and other symptoms such as pain or fatigue tend to develop and worsen over several weeks or months. It’s usually most noticeable in the morning. It often eases up after an hour or two, but it can last all day.

source: webmd.com
Numbness and Tingling
Numbness and Tingling

Your swollen joints can push against nerves, which can make you feel tingling in different parts of your body. Common spots for this to happen include your elbows, ankles, and wrists. Common spots for this to happen include your elbows, ankles, and wrists.

source: webmd.com

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