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Types of Ragam

Auḍava rāgas
Auḍava rāgas

Auḍava rāgas Auḍava rāgas are janya ragas that have exactly five notes in ascending and descending scale (arohana and avarohana). Examples are : Examples are :

Janaka Ragas
Janaka Ragas

Mēḷakarta ragas are parent ragas (hence known as janaka ragas) from which other ragas may be generated. A melakarta raga is sometimes referred as mela, karta or sampurna as well, though the latter term is inaccurate, as a sampurna raga need not be a melakarta (take the raga Bhairavi, for example).

Janya Ragas
Janya Ragas

Janya ragas are Carnatic music ragas derived from the fundamental set of 72 ragas called Melakarta ragas, by the permutation and combination of the various ascending and descending notes. The process of deriving janya ragas from the parent melakartas is complex and leads to an open mathematical possibility of around thirty thousand ragas.

Kalpanaswaram
Kalpanaswaram

In Carnatic Music, Kalpanaswaram (also called swarakalpana, svarakalpana, manodharmaswara or just swaras), is raga improvisation within a specific tala in which the musician improvises in the Indian music solfege (sa, ri, ga, ma, pa, da, ni) after completing a composition.

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Niraval
Niraval

Niraval is a very interesting concept of exhibiting Carnatic music proficiency. The artistes usually take one big phrase or a sentence and present it in accordance with their manodharma (i.e., usually ad hoc improvisation, of course in the boundaries of that ragam).

source: quora.com
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Raag Bhairavi
Raag Bhairavi

Bhairavi is a janya rāgam in Carnatic music (musical scale of South Indian classical music). Though it is a sampoorna rāgam (scale having all 7 notes), it has two different dhaivathams in its scale making it a Bhashanga Ragam, and hence is not classified as a melakarta rāgam (parent scale).

Raag Bhimpalasi
Raag Bhimpalasi

This page is a list of Film Songs Based upon rag Bhimpalasi

Raag Gaud
Raag Gaud

A raga or raaga (IAST: rāga; also raag or ragam ; literally "coloring, tingeing, dyeing") is a melodic framework for improvisation akin to a melodic mode in Indian classical music. While the raga is a remarkable and central feature of the classical music tradition, it has no direct translation to concepts in the classical European music tradition.

Raag Kedar
Raag Kedar

Raga Shuddha Kedar de-emphasizes the meends and the teevra madhyam, and instead sharpens the arohatmaka shuddha nishad, as witness the following Bhimsen recording. The counterpart of Kedar in the Carnatic paddhati is known as Hameer Kalyani.

source: parrikar.org
image: youtube.com
Raag Pahadi
Raag Pahadi

A raga or raaga (IAST: rāga; also raag or ragam ; literally "coloring, tingeing, dyeing") is a melodic framework for improvisation akin to a melodic mode in Indian classical music. While the raga is a remarkable and central feature of the classical music tradition, it has no direct translation to concepts in the classical European music tradition.

Raag Yaman
Raag Yaman

Yaman's Jati is a Sampurna raga and in some cases Shadav; the ascending Aaroha scale and the descending style of the avroha includes all seven notes in the octave ( When it is Shadav, the Aroha goes like N,RGmDNS' , but the Avaroha is the same complete octave).

Raga Alapana
Raga Alapana

This module is a quick summary of the steps that go into learning how to do raga alapana in Sankarabharanam. Students can use this as a consolidated summary of the concepts taught thus far, before they go on to the next steps.

Tanam
Tanam

Ragam Tanam Pallavi is a form of singing in Carnatic music which allows the musicians to improvise to a great extent. It is one of the most complete aspects of Indian classical music, demonstrating the entire gamut of talents and the depth of knowledge of the musician.

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Vakra Ragas
Vakra Ragas

There are 26 Bhashanga ragas in Carnatic music. Vakra raga - if arohana or avarohana or both take zig-zag course or twist, ot is called a vakra raga.. Vakra ragas are further classifed into: Sampurna vakra if arohana and avarohana are sampurna (with all seven notes present) Vakra varja if they have less than seven notes.

source: angelfire.com
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