A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Rainfall

Convectional Rainfall
Convectional Rainfall

Convectional rainfall occurs when the warm air deflected from a landform rises and forms rain clouds. Convectional rainfall is very common in tropical areas as well as areas in southeastern... Convectional rainfall occurs when the warm air deflected from a landform rises and forms rain clouds.

source: reference.com
Cyclonic/Frontal Rainfall
Cyclonic/Frontal Rainfall

Quick Answer. Cyclonic rainfall, also known as frontal rain, is caused when two air masses of different temperatures meet. Warm air and cool air donĀ“t mix, as they have different densities.

source: reference.com
Freezing Rain
Freezing Rain

Freezing rain is rainfall that has become "supercool" as it falls. It is caused when falling snowflakes melt through a warm layer of air high in the atmosphere to become rain. This rain then gets extremely cold again while falling through sub-zero temperatures.

source: thesun.co.uk
image: 680news.com
Freezing Rain
Freezing Rain

Freezing rain is rainfall that has become "supercool" as it falls. It is caused when falling snowflakes melt through a warm layer of air high in the atmosphere to become rain. This rain then gets extremely cold again while falling through sub-zero temperatures.

source: thesun.co.uk
Frontal Rainfall
Frontal Rainfall

Frontal rainfall is a type of condensation that occurs when a cold front meets a warm front. Warm air is less dense than cold air. When the two air masses meet, warm air is forced over the cold air, because it is less dense.

source: reference.com
Frontal Rainfall
Frontal Rainfall

Frontal rainfall is a type of condensation that occurs when a cold front meets a warm front. Warm air is less dense than cold air. When the two air masses meet, warm air is forced over the cold air, because it is less dense. When the air becomes fully saturated, rain begins to fall.

source: reference.com
Hail Hail Forms in Cumulonimbus Clouds
Hail Hail Forms in Cumulonimbus Clouds

Cumulonimbus clouds, also known as thunderheads, release hail and rain in conjunction with updrafts. Ice crystals ride such updrafts into the air and then fall through the clouds, collecting water... Cumulonimbus clouds, also known as thunderheads, release hail and rain in conjunction with updrafts.

source: reference.com
Orographic/Relief Rainfall
Orographic/Relief Rainfall

Orographic rainfall is rain that is produced from the lifting of moist air over a mountain. The moist air rises and cools, producing orographic clouds, which are the source of the rain. Most orographic rain falls upwind of the mountain range, with some also falling a short distance downwind.

source: reference.com
image: cssmith.co
Rain
Rain

Rainfall is the result of water vapor condensing and precipitating, forming droplets that fall from clouds due to gravity. It is an important part of the water cycle. Condensation occurs when the air cools and becomes saturated. Clouds form when water condenses on particles in the air. The air can ...

source: reference.com
Rain
Rain

Rainfall is the result of water vapor condensing and precipitating, forming droplets that fall from clouds due to gravity. It is an important part of the water... Rainfall is the result of water vapor condensing and precipitating, forming droplets that fall from clouds due to gravity.

source: reference.com
Relief Rainfall
Relief Rainfall

Relief rain occurs when warm, moist air ascends along the slope of a mountain. The air then condenses and rainfall occurs on the windward side. The leeward side of the mountain receives very little rainfall.

source: reference.com
Relief Rainfall
Relief Rainfall

Relief rainfall, also known as orographic rainfall, is a type of rain caused by warm, moist air that is forced to rise as it passes over higher elevations. As the moist air rises, it also cools and condenses, forming clouds and eventually, rain.

source: reference.com
Sleet
Sleet

Sleet is frozen precipitation that falls as ice pellets that you may see bouncing off your windshield, roof or the ground. Depending on the intensity and duration, sleet can accumulate much like you see with snow.

source: weather.com
Snow Snow Forms via Sublimation
Snow Snow Forms via Sublimation

Usually, yes. Snow should melt first before it can evaporate. Because snow is a form of ice and ice is a solid. Hence, it needs to return to liquid state (water) to evaporate. Can Snow sublimate (better word than evaporation in this context) directly to vapour? Yes it is possible. It depends on the atmospheric conditions.

source: quora.com
Snow Snow Forms via Sublimation
Snow Snow Forms via Sublimation

Sublimation is the conversion between the solid and the gaseous phases of matter, with no intermediate liquid stage. For those of us interested in the water cycle, sublimation is most often used to describe the process of snow and ice changing into water vapor in the air without first melting into water.