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Types of Reproduction

Asexual Reproduction
Asexual Reproduction

Sexual vs. Asexual Reproduction Living things use lots of different strategies for producing offspring, but most strategies fall neatly into the categories of either sexual or asexual reproduction. Asexual reproduction generates offspring that are genetically identical to a single parent.

Budding
Budding

Budding, in biology, a form of asexual reproduction in which a new individual develops from some generative anatomical point of the parent organism. In some species buds may be produced from almost any point of the body, but in many cases budding is restricted to specialized areas.

Double Fertilization
Double Fertilization

Double fertilization is a complex fertilization mechanism of flowering plants (angiosperms). This process involves the joining of a female gametophyte (megagametophyte, also called the embryo sac) with two male gametes (sperm).

image: quazoo.com
Fission
Fission

Binary Fission. Most bacteria rely on binary fission for propagation. Conceptually this is a simple process; a cell just needs to grow to twice its starting size and then split in two.

Fragmentation
Fragmentation

Fragmentation or clonal fragmentation in multi cellular or colonial organisms is a form of asexual reproduction or cloning in which an organism is split into fragments. Each of these fragments develop into mature, fully grown individuals that are clones of the original organism.

Pollen
Pollen

Pollen is a fine to coarse powdery substance comprising pollen grains which are male microgametophytes of seed plants, which produce male gametes (sperm cells). Pollen grains have a hard coat made of sporopollenin that protects the gametophytes during the process of their movement from the stamens to the pistil of flowering plants, or from the male cone to the female cone of coniferous plants.

Pollination and Pollinators
Pollination and Pollinators

During plant reproduction, pollen grains. need to move from the anther of one flower to the stigma of another flower. This is called pollination. Insects can pollinate flowers, and so can the wind.

source: bbc.com
Selfing and Outcrossing
Selfing and Outcrossing

selfing A method of seed generation in which pollination is performed manually and the pollen donor and egg donor are from the same plant. Selfing and Outcrossing Most flowering plant species reproduce primarily by outcrossing, including the great majority of trees, shrubs, and perennial herbs.

source: en.mimi.hu
image: nature.com
Sexual Reproduction in Angiosperms: Ovule Formation
Sexual Reproduction in Angiosperms: Ovule Formation

Angiosperms are the flowering plants (today the most abundant and diverse plants on earth). Most are terrestrial and all lack locomotion. This poses several problems.

image: s-cool.co.uk
Spores
Spores

Many larger algae reproduce by spores and are also capable of sexual reproduction. A number of red algae species produce monospores (walled nonflagellate spherical cells) that are carried by water currents and form a new organism upon germination.

The Fruit
The Fruit

A fruit is a ripened ovary (or compound ovary)… A brief treatment of fruit follows. For information on particular fruits, see apple, banana, orange, peach, and so on. For treatment of the fruit as a reproductive structure, see seed and fruit. For treatment of the cultivation of fruits, see fruit farming.

The Seed
The Seed

Asexual reproduction produces new individuals without the fusion of gametes, genetically identical to the parent plants and each other, except when mutations occur. In seed plants, the offspring can be packaged in a protective seed, which is used as an agent of dispersal.

Vegetative Reproduction
Vegetative Reproduction

Vegetative reproduction in plants is defined as a type of asexual reproduction, wherein the vegetative parts, like roots, stem and leaves give rise to new plants. This mode of vegetative propagation or vegetative reproduction is associated with certain advantages and disadvantages.