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Types of Rhetorical Devices

Alliteration
Alliteration

Alliteration Definition. Alliteration is derived from Latin’s “Latira”. It means “letters of alphabet”. It is a stylistic device in which a number of words, having the same first consonant sound, occur close together in a series.

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Allusion
Allusion

Allusion is a brief and indirect reference to a person, place, thing or idea of historical, cultural, literary or political significance. It does not describe in detail the person or thing to which it refers.

Anaphora
Anaphora

As a literary device, anaphora serves the purpose of giving artistic effect to passages of prose and poetry. As a rhetorical device, anaphora is used to appeal to the emotions of the audience, in order to persuade, inspire, motivate, and encourage them.

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Anastrophe
Anastrophe

Anastrophe is a rhetorical term for the inversion of conventional word order. It is often used to emphasize one or more of the reversed words. Anastrophe is a rhetorical term for the inversion of conventional word order.

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Antithesis
Antithesis

Antithesis, which literally means “opposite,” is a rhetorical device in which two opposite ideas are put together in a sentence to achieve a contrasting effect. Antithesis emphasizes the idea of contrast by parallel structures of the contrasted phrases or clauses.

Aposiopesis
Aposiopesis

Definition of Aposiopesis. Aposiopesis is derived from a Greek word that means “becoming silent.” It is a rhetorical device that can be defined as a figure of speech in which the speaker or writer breaks off abruptly, and leaves the statement incomplete.

Hyperbole
Hyperbole

It is a device that we employ in our day-to-day speech. For instance, when you meet a friend after a long time, you say, “It’s been ages since I last saw you.” You may not have met him for three or four hours, or a day, but the use of the word “ages” exaggerates this statement to add emphasis to your wait. Therefore, a hyperbole is an unreal exaggeration to emphasize the real situation. Some other common Hyperbole examples are given below.

Hypophora
Hypophora

Difference Between Hypophora and Rhetorical Question. The basic difference between hypophora and a rhetorical question is that, in a rhetorical question, the answer is not provided by the writer, since it does not require an answer. Such as, “… for if we lose the ability to perceive our faults, what is the good of living on?” (Marcus Aurelius).

Litotes
Litotes

Litotes, derived from a Greek word meaning “simple”, is a figure of speech which employs an understatement by using double negatives or, in other words, positive statement is expressed by negating its opposite expressions.

Metaphor
Metaphor

Furthermore, a metaphor develops a comparison that is different from a simile, in that we do not use “like” or “as” to develop a comparison in a metaphor. It actually makes an implicit or hidden comparison and not an explicit one.

Principal Rhetorical and Literary Devices
Principal Rhetorical and Literary Devices

Principal Rhetorical and Literary Devices 1. Alliteration: repetition of the same letter at beginning of words or syllables: Marcus me momordit. 2. Anaphora: the repetition of a word or phrase for emphasis:

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