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Types of Roofs Shapes

Asphalt Roll Roof
Asphalt Roll Roof

Depending on budget constraints and the shape and slope of roof that needs to be worked on, options vary. One type of roofing material commonly used is roll roofing. Roll roofing works like traditional shingle-clad roofing to protect the underlayment of the roof's structure.

Asphalt Shingles
Asphalt Shingles

Roofing & Siding; Asphalt Shingles: A Showcase of Roofing Styles, Colors and Options Asphalt shingles are one of the best values you can buy with regard to roofing materials for your home.

source: bobvila.com
Butterfly Roof
Butterfly Roof

Monitor roof: A roof with a monitor; 'a raised structure running part or all of the way along the ridge of a double-pitched roof, with its own roof running parallel with the main roof.' Butterfly roof (V-roof, London roof): A V-shaped roof resembling an open book.

Clay (Spanish) Tile Roof
Clay (Spanish) Tile Roof

Barrel Tile – While “barrel” is a term used to describe any semi-cylindrical tile such as Spanish and Roman, the true barrel tile is actually tapered, being wider at one end than the other. This is because barrel tiles were traditionally shaped over the clay worker’s leg.

Composite Shingle Roof
Composite Shingle Roof

Composite shingles do not blister, peel or warp and have very little fading over their lifespan. Color Choices There is wide color range of composite shingles and a wide choice of shapes. The strip style of shingle is the least expensive and the most common. Laminated shingles are made to replicate the look of wood and are a thicker material.

source: hunker.com
Gable Roof
Gable Roof

Gabled roofs are the kind young children typically draw. They have two sloping sides that come together at a ridge, creating end walls with a triangular extension, called a gable, at the top. The house shown here has two gable roofs and two dormers, each with gable roofs of their own.

Gambrel Roof
Gambrel Roof

Find the most popular roof shapes and styles, their ... Gambrel Roof. Although it is ... gambrel roofs have a shape that provides more room for storage without ...

source: myrooff.com
image: wikihow.com
Hip Roof
Hip Roof

A hip (or hipped) roof slopes down to the eaves on all four sides, forming a horizontal "ridge." A roofer will usually put a vent along the top of this ridge. Although a hip roof is not gabled, it may have dormers or connecting wings with gables.

source: thoughtco.com
Jerkinhead Roof
Jerkinhead Roof

A jerkinhead roof may also be called a Jerkin Head Roof, a Half-hipped Roof, a Clipped Gable, or even a Jerkinhead Gable. Jerkinhead roofs are sometimes found on American bungalows and cottages, small American houses from the 1920s and 1930s, and assorted Victorian house styles.

source: thoughtco.com
Mansard Roof
Mansard Roof

Types: Mansard roofs come in a variety of shapes, the most common being straight-angle, convex and concave silhouettes. Flat Roof Flat roof shapes, as the name suggests, look completely flat to the naked eye.

source: myrooff.com
Membrane Roofing Material:
Membrane Roofing Material:

* Low slope roofs have less than 4" rise per 12" of run; high slope roofs have more than 4" of rise per 12" of run. Simple roof shapes have 6 or fewer distinct roof planes; common roof shapes have between 6 and 12 roof planes and complex roof shapes have 12+ roof planes. Membrane Roof cost estimates may require an onsite inspection.

source: homewyse.com
Metal:
Metal:

All roofs, even ones that look flat, need to slope to some degree so that snowmelt and rainfall can drain off. But beyond that basic requirement, architects and builders have a lot of leeway, and they've used that creative freedom to invent a wonderful array of roof designs.

image: it-guide.me
Skillion Roof
Skillion Roof

Skillion Roof More commonly referred to as shed or lean-to roofs, skillion roofs feature just one slope. One end of the roof rests on a taller wall than the other. As a result, skillion roof designs may look like a more angled flat roof or half of a pitched roof. Even though modern architectural styles have adapted this design to cover entire structures, skillion roofs are most commonly used for sheds, porches and home additions.

source: myrooff.com
image: smore.com
Slate Roof
Slate Roof

Find the most popular roof shapes and styles ... Hip Roof. Hip roofs have four sides with slopes of equal ... slate and asphalt shingles are some of the most ...

source: myrooff.com
Slate Shingles:
Slate Shingles:

When thinking of slate roofing, what probably comes to mind are square, uniform grey or black stone tiles neatly arranged on the skull of a building. This reliable building material, however, is far from uniform.

Standing Seam Metal Roof
Standing Seam Metal Roof

Standing seam roofing systems are a popular roofing choice as they are available in many metal materials including zinc, steel, lead and copper. Standing seam roofing systems are a popular roofing choice as they are available in many metal materials including zinc, steel, lead and copper.

image: memphite.com
Tile:
Tile:

Fired roof tiles are found as early as the 3rd millennium BC in the Early Helladic House of the tiles in Lerna, Greece. Debris found at the site contained thousands of terracotta tiles having fallen from the roof. In the Mycenaean period, roofs tiles are documented for Gla and Midea.

Wood Shake
Wood Shake

Get the Cedar Bureau's downloadable PDF for Wood Shakes and Shingles roof installation or wall installation manuals. It is now recommended that stainless steel nails be used for the installation of all wood shakes and shingles. WE CAN ALSO GET YOU: Fancy-butt shingles like those at left.

Wood Shake Shingle Roof Lifespan: 35-40 Years
Wood Shake Shingle Roof Lifespan: 35-40 Years

Wood roof life: How Long Will a Wood Shingle or ... shingle or wood shake roofs Wood shingle or wood shake roof life ... a wood shingle roof is 30-40 years.

Wood Shingle Roof Lifespan: 25 Years
Wood Shingle Roof Lifespan: 25 Years

The average lifespan of asphalt shingles ranges from 20 to 40 years depending on the manufacturer, although many warranties only guarantee between 15 and 25 years. Fiberglass shingles are more expensive, but can last more than 50 years.

image: iko.com