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Types of Rope Knots

Bowline​
Bowline​

The Bowline forms a secure loop that will not jam and is easy to tie and untie. The Bowline is most commonly used for forming a fixed loop, large or small at the end of a line. Tried and tested over centuries, this knot is reliable, strong and stable.

source: netknots.com
image: netknots.com
Clove Hitch​
Clove Hitch​

However, as a hitch it should be used with caution because it can slip or come undone if the object it is tied to rotates or if constant pressure is not maintained on the line. Scroll to see Animated Clove Hitch Knot below the illustration and tying instructions.

source: netknots.com
Cow Hitch​
Cow Hitch​

Cow Hitch. How to tie the Cow Hitch Knot. The Cow Hitch, also called the Lanyard Hitch, Lark’s Head and Lark’s Foot, is used to secure a rope to a post or other object including another rope. It is similar to a Clove Hitch except that the second half hitch is in the opposite direction.

source: netknots.com
image: 101knots.com
Figure-Eight ​Knot​
Figure-Eight ​Knot​

The figure eight follow through is one of the strongest knots. It forms a secure, non-slip loop at the end of a rope. Also known as the Flemish Bend, this is the most widely used tie-in knot by mountain climbers.

source: netknots.com
image: quazoo.com
Fisherman's ​Knot​
Fisherman's ​Knot​

Teaching the world to tie knots since 1993! For over 25 years NetKnots has provided helpful information about fishing knots and rope knots with easy to follow step by step knot tying illustrations and animations for tying over 150 of the most popular and most useful knots. We continually update the site with new additions and more information.

source: netknots.com
Flemish Bend​
Flemish Bend​

How to tie a Flemish Bend. All knots animated, illustrated and explained

source: netknots.com
image: howset.com
Improved ​Clinch Knot​
Improved ​Clinch Knot​

Improved Clinch Knot Details. Uses: The Improved Clinch knot is one of the most widely used fishing knots. It provides a good method of securing a fishing line to a hook, lure, or swivel. The "improved" version shown here includes an extra tuck under the final turn (step 9). It is commonly used to fasten the leader to the fly.

image: netknots.com
Overhand ​Knot​
Overhand ​Knot​

Overhand Knot Tying Details. Uses: The Overhand Knot was described by Ashley (ABOK # 46, p 14) as "the simplest of the Single-Strand Stopper Knots." It can also be used to prevent the end of a piece of rope unraveling.

Reef Knot​
Reef Knot​

The Reef Knot or Square Knot is quick and easy to tie; it is a good knot for securing non-critical items. Not to be trusted to join two ropes together. This knot was used for centuries by sailors for reefing sails, hence the name Reef Knot, and tying things aboard ship.

source: netknots.com
Rolling Hitch​
Rolling Hitch​

A Rolling Hitch will not hold at all in such materials. Critical Details: The animation correctly shows that the blue rope is parallel to the red. The "pull" MUST be in line with the main rope (or the pole). If the tension is away from the standing rope or pole, this knot is likely to fail.

Round Turn ​and two Half-Hitches​
Round Turn ​and two Half-Hitches​

A Useful Boating Knot: A Round Turn and Two (or more) Half Hitches (ABOK # 1720, p 296) is useful for attaching a mooring line to a dock post or ring although probably less secure than the Anchor (Fisherman's) Hitch.

image: quazoo.com
Sheepshank​
Sheepshank​

Sheepshank Knot Tying Fold the rope to approximately the desired new length. Form a Half Hitch in one standing end, drop it over the adjacent bight, and tighten it. Form a Half Hitch in the other standing end, drop it over its adjacent bight, and then tighten it too. Apply the load carefully.

Sheet Bend​
Sheet Bend​

Scroll to see Animated Sheet Bend Knot below the illustration and tying instructions. Sheet Bend aka Weaver's Knot Tying Instructions. Form a loop in the end of one rope. Pass the free end of the rope to be joined under the opening of the loop, around both parts of the first rope and back under itself. Pull all four ends to tighten.

source: netknots.com
Timber Hitch​
Timber Hitch​

Timber Hitch. How to tie the Timber Hitch Knot. Use for securing a rope around a post or any cylindrical object. It does not jam or slip, no matter how heavy the load and is easy to tie and untie. It is best to complete the Timber Hitch with one or two half hitches near the hauling end to keep the load from twisting.

source: netknots.com
image: 101knots.com

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