A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Satellite

Elliptical Satellite Orbits
Elliptical Satellite Orbits

The satellite elliptical orbit gives a number of coverage options that are not available when circular orbits are used. Highly elliptical orbit, HEO, basics. As the name implies, an elliptical orbit or as it is more commonly known the highly elliptical orbit, HEO, follows the curve of an ellipse.

image: quora.com
Geostationary Earth Orbit, GEO
Geostationary Earth Orbit, GEO

A geosynchronous orbit is a high Earth orbit that allows satellites to match Earth's rotation. Located at 22,236 miles (35,786 kilometers) above Earth's equator, this position is a valuable spot for monitoring weather, communications and surveillance.

source: space.com
Geostationary Satellites
Geostationary Satellites

A geostationary satellite orbits the earth directly over the equator, approximately 22,000 miles up. At this altitude, one complete trip around the earth (relative to the sun) takes 24 hours. At this altitude, one complete trip around the earth (relative to the sun) takes 24 hours.

image: quora.com
Geostationary Satellites
Geostationary Satellites

A geostationary satellite is an earth-orbiting satellite, placed at an altitude of approximately 35,800 kilometers (22,300 miles) directly over the equator, that revolves in the same direction the earth rotates (west to east).

Geosynchronous
Geosynchronous

A geosynchronous satellite is a satellite in geosynchronous orbit, with an orbital period the same as the Earth's rotation period. Such a satellite returns to the same position in the sky after each sidereal day, and over the course of a day traces out a path in the sky that is typically some form of analemma.

image: youtube.com
Geosynchronous Satellites
Geosynchronous Satellites

A geosynchronous orbit is a high Earth orbit that allows satellites to match Earth's rotation. Located at 22,236 miles (35,786 kilometers) above Earth's equator, this position is a valuable spot for monitoring weather, communications and surveillance.

source: space.com
Geosynchronous Satellites
Geosynchronous Satellites

A geosynchronous orbit is a high Earth orbit that allows satellites to match Earth's rotation. Located at 22,236 miles (35,786 kilometers) above Earth's equator, this position is a valuable spot for monitoring weather, communications and surveillance.

source: space.com
image: quora.com
Low Earth Orbit, LEO
Low Earth Orbit, LEO

Low earth orbits (LEO) are satellite systems used in telecommunication, which orbit between 400 and 1,000 miles above the earth's surface. They are used mainly for data communication such as email, video conferencing and paging.

Low Earth Orbits
Low Earth Orbits

Low earth orbits (LEO) are satellite systems used in telecommunication, which orbit between 400 and 1,000 miles above the earth's surface. They are used mainly for data communication such as email, video conferencing and paging.

Placing Satellite in Orbit
Placing Satellite in Orbit

For example, the Canadian RADARSAT satellites are in Sun-synchronous orbit s, which ensure that the point directly beneath the satellite is always seen with the Sun at the same angle. There can be a lot of calculation required to design a particular orbit.

source: quora.com
Polar
Polar

Polar is a cylindrical satellite of 2.4 meters in diameter and 1.8 meters in height built by the "Astro Space" division of Martin Marietta. WIND is a stabilized satellite rotation at a speed of 10 rpm about its axis which is maintained perpendicular to the plane of the ecliptic.

Pupil Worksheet
Pupil Worksheet

Pupil Worksheet Satellites are usually classified according to the type of orbit they are in. There are four types of orbit associated with satellites, and the type of orbit dictates a satellite's use.

source: telescope.org
image: study.com
Pupil Worksheet Questions on Types of Satellite
Pupil Worksheet Questions on Types of Satellite

Pupil Worksheet Questions on Types of Satellite. Read the article on "Types of Satellite" and answer the following questions. 1. What is the Earth's natural satellite? 2. What was the first satellite in space? 3. Most of the modern satellites orbiting the Earth carry very little fuel, but are in space for many years. Where do they get there energy from? 4.

source: telescope.org
image: study.com
Satellite Orbits
Satellite Orbits

A satellite that orbits directly above the equator has zero inclination. If a satellite orbits from the north pole (geographic, not magnetic) to the south pole, its inclination is 90 degrees. If a satellite orbits from the north pole (geographic, not magnetic) to the south pole, its inclination is 90 degrees.

image: phys.org
Speed = Distance÷Time
Speed = Distance÷Time

A particular satellite can have only one speed when in orbit around a particular body at a given distance because the force of gravity doesn’t change. So what’s that speed? You can calculate it with the equations for centripetal force and gravitational force. For a satellite of a particular mass,

source: dummies.com
Sun-Synchronous Orbits
Sun-Synchronous Orbits

A Sun-synchronous orbit (SSO, also called a heliosynchronous orbit) is a nearly polar orbit around a planet, in which the satellite passes over any given point of the planet's surface at the same local mean solar time.