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Types of Secretion

Adrenal Glands
Adrenal Glands

The adrenal medulla is at the centre of each adrenal gland, and is surrounded by the adrenal cortex. The chromaffin cells of the medulla are the body's main source of the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline, released by the medulla.

Eccrine Sweat Glands
Eccrine Sweat Glands

The secretion of eccrine glands is a sterile, dilute electrolyte solution with primary components of bicarbonate, potassium, and sodium chloride (NaCl), and other minor components such as glucose, pyruvate, lactate, cytokines, immunoglobulins, antimicrobial peptides (e.g., dermcidin), and many others.

Hypothalamus
Hypothalamus

The hypothalamus is a small but crucial part of the brain. It controls several important functions, including sleep and growth. Learn more about its different parts and some of the conditions that affect it.

Lacrimal Gland
Lacrimal Gland

The lacrimal glands release their secretions directly onto the eyeball and are thus classified as serous type of exocrine glands with acini secretory elements. Lacrimal gland is an important part of the lacrimal apparatus (the lacrimal system) that plays an essential role in maintaining the normal anatomy of the eye.

source: kenhub.com
Mammary Gland (Breast Milk)
Mammary Gland (Breast Milk)

A mammary gland is an exocrine gland in mammals that produces milk to feed young offspring. Mammals get their name from the Latin word mamma, ... Milk secretion ...

Pancreas
Pancreas

Pancreatic Secretion Overview The exocrine pancreas secretes an aqueous mixture into the duodenum composed of digestive enzymes, which aid in further degradation of ingested food, and bicarbonate which helps neutralize stomach acid.

Parathyroids
Parathyroids

Two unique types of cells are present in the parathyroid gland: Chief cells, which synthesize and release parathyroid hormone. These cells are small, and appear dark when loaded with parathyroid hormone, and clear when the hormone has been secreted, or in their resting state.

Pineal Body
Pineal Body

The pineal gland, also known as the conarium or epiphysis cerebri, is a small endocrine gland in the vertebrate brain. The pineal gland produces melatonin, a serotonin-derived hormone which modulates sleep patterns in both circadian and seasonal cycles.

Pituitary Gland
Pituitary Gland

Panhypopituitarism: It is due to decreased secretion of all the anterior pituitary gland hormones. It may be congenital (or) it may occur suddenly during the life of the individual. Dwarfism: It is due to deficiency of anterior pituitary gland secretion during childhood.

Reproductive Glands
Reproductive Glands

The accessory glands of the male reproductive system are the seminal vesicles, prostate gland, and the bulbourethral glands. These glands secrete fluids that enter the urethra. These glands secrete fluids that enter the urethra.

Salivary Glands
Salivary Glands

The submandibular glands (previously known as submaxillary glands) are a pair of major salivary glands located beneath the lower jaws, superior to the digastric muscles. The secretion produced is a mixture of both serous fluid and mucus, and enters the oral cavity via the submandibular duct or Wharton duct.

Thyroid
Thyroid

The thyroid gland is one component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, which is a prime example of a negative feedback control system. The production and secretion of thyroxine and triiodothyronine by the thyroid gland are stimulated by the hypothalamic hormone thyrotropin-releasing hormone and the anterior pituitary hormone thyrotropin.

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